• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
EddieV223

New c++11 video tutorials, tell me what you think.

11 posts in this topic

Hi, I have been working on making some c++ video tutorials.  They are on youtube and are free to watch.  They start at absolute beginner to advanced and will cover c++11.  I have the first 13 videos uploaded onto youtube, more are on the way.  I want some feedback, how am I doing?  Let me know what you think.

 

Some example feed back I would like is, am I being clear enough in my explanations and how is my order of topic introduction?

 

I know that in some of the videos the video quality is not great, I tried some different codecs and around video 9 or 10 found a good one.  The early codec was making it a bit fuzzy and made my voice sound more nasally than it is. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXjSIEICHR3OW7Ala0hkwNSrVE0uUpH6c

Edited by EddieV223
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched video 3, 5, 7, and 8.

 

Some points.

  • You should not name variables as single characters, particularly in instructional code. Use longer names, so anyone mimicking your code will do it too.
  • You should use a lower monitor resolution or smaller capture window. That way your code will be easier read in video.
  • You mention that < returns a bool. You should point out that this implies that you cannot chain <, such as while( 5 < loopcount <10). You may find yourself needing to explain that bool is automatically convertible to int.
  • I think you should separate C++ from the particulars of the IDE you're using. It's good to teach C++ and the IDE together, but you should point out things that are particular to your IDE.

  • You should probably mention that >, >=, ==, != and <= exists when you mention <.

  • If this is C++11, you need to at least mention the existance of range based for loop.

  • Don't say assign when you mean initialize. You don't need to explain the difference between the two right away, but it would be less confusing if you used the correct terminology, so that beginners won't get confused when it does become relevant.

  • You should mention that using i, j, and k as loop indexes is convention.

  • Do you introduce what endl does when you first use it?
  • People should use while when the number of iterations is not known in advance, such as if it depends on user input. Say that. Maybe provide an example. Maybe provide the example before introducing for loops.
  • You should make sure to underscore the importance of indentation to beginners.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should not name variables as single characters, particularly in instructional code. Use longer names, so anyone mimicking your code will do it too.

 

This depends really.  'i' for example is pretty well established as index, and thus j,k, etc... as additional loop indices is pretty well established.  U, V, X, Y and Z all also have established meanings and should be used when appropriate.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should not name variables as single characters, particularly in instructional code. Use longer names, so anyone mimicking your code will do it too.

 

This depends really.  'i' for example is pretty well established as index, and thus j,k, etc... as additional loop indices is pretty well established.  U, V, X, Y and Z all also have established meanings and should be used when appropriate.

That's true, but in the video he creates a bool and called it "b". That's bad practice. Sure, since it's just an example, the value doesn't have any meaning, but calling it "my_first_bool" would be better in my opinion.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You should not name variables as single characters, particularly in instructional code. Use longer names, so anyone mimicking your code will do it too.

 

This depends really.  'i' for example is pretty well established as index, and thus j,k, etc... as additional loop indices is pretty well established.  U, V, X, Y and Z all also have established meanings and should be used when appropriate.

That's true, but in the video he creates a bool and called it "b". That's bad practice. Sure, since it's just an example, the value doesn't have any meaning, but calling it "my_first_bool" would be better in my opinion.

 

Yeah, thats bad.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After having seen stuff like "MyClass" and "myInt" in actual production code (map<...> theMap), I don't think it matters what he uses. If the variable has absolutely no meaning besides being there to demonstrate its existence, the name will ultimately be pointless and people will copy that, no matter what. At least one person would probably even copy it if it was named purelyForDemonstrationAndForGodsSakeDontNameYourVariablesLikeThis.

 

I missed the days of Hungarian madness... I swear to god I've seen bBool and pszString hundreds of times in production code.  Even saw people use Hungarian notation on indexes, resulting in my all time favorite variable, iI.

 

 

Actually my second favourite variable, my favorite variable of all time was:

 

DoNotRenameOrRemoveThisVariableOrElse

 

And you couldn't... if you touched it, the code blew up, and I never had the time to root out why, so like all the other programmers that inherited the code before me, I left the damned magic variable alone!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the feedback the more I can get the better the videos become and everyone wins.

 

I have uploaded several more videos in the series with a better resolution and settings.

 

I am planning on rerecording some the early videos in the new resolution and settings as well as make some changes to the content that you guys have suggested, to improve them.

Edited by EddieV223
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched #14. Only problem here is that you don't explain srand() I don't know if you use it in earlier videos though, and explain it then.

 

Watched #18. Looks good. No new issues.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More videos added and I added the topics to the video names.

 

The entire series is just under 6.5 hours total and growing.

Edited by EddieV223
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0