• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
kheealam

Game management

10 posts in this topic

I just want to ask how to do game management..I mean in terms of classes and their relation..what should be done should i use design patterns or something..i just want to get the ability to think in terms of management..Today i was writing a basic TIC TAC TOE game and tried to think in terms of OOP but i dont know whether i was doing right or wrong.I just did some paper work..i want help.An example game would be helpful and also if there is some good book out there then do tell me also...
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked for an example game ...Even if it is small.if you can give me rather than saying that i need to learn OOP...and by the way these are not "little details"..they are big

-3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to ask how to do game management..I mean in terms of classes and their relation..what should be done should i use design patterns or something..i just want to get the ability to think in terms of management..Today i was writing a basic TIC TAC TOE game and tried to think in terms of OOP but i dont know whether i was doing right or wrong.I just did some paper work..i want help.An example game would be helpful and also if there is some good book out there then do tell me also...

 

You won't go far wrong with these...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_aren't_gonna_need_it
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don't_repeat_yourself

 

As you work on more advanced games you will find that you need to do more design up-front. But that comes with experience.

 

Start with structured programming (that means functions, loops and no gotos). Tic Tac Toe doesn't need OOP so save it for the next project.

 

I wouldn't look for books about game programming at this stage. Look for general programming. Anything by Herb Sutter or Scott Meyers is good, assuming you are using C++.

 

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with L Spiro and EWClay on this one. Game programming isn't where you start, but it's a nice place to end up.

 

When I started programming, all I wanted to do was make games, so as soon as I could render a jpg I was off and running (and crashing and burning). There's a lot of behind the scenes stuff that goes into making a game, at a very abstract level, and understanding all of the fundamentals about procedural and object-oriented programming is an absolute must.

 

As far as learning how to sketch out your ideas on paper, I would look into buying a book on UML, it's a fairly standard design language for object-oriented programming and you might get a sense for how larger projects are structured from the examples in the book. This is the book that I have, if you want to go that route.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately there's very little broad guidelines that we can give you about how to think in OOP. You need practice, and if you can manage it, find someone to review your code.

 

One piece of advice that I can give, is find a book. A book will have examples and hopefully exercises, like you want.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to ask how to do game management..I mean in terms of classes and their relation..what should be done should i use design patterns or something..i just want to get the ability to think in terms of management..Today i was writing a basic TIC TAC TOE game and tried to think in terms of OOP but i dont know whether i was doing right or wrong.I just did some paper work..i want help.An example game would be helpful and also if there is some good book out there then do tell me also...

Instead of thinking game management, think of how you can manage your code. Is your code flexible and maintainable? Can I use this code in other project with very few tweaks?

 

Well you are in luck because I coded my TicTacBoard last year and still have it as a good reference so I can tell you how you can make your code reusable and how I lay out my game design. 

 

a folder named buttonimages(that contains the images of the cross and X)

a class that setup the TicTacBoard

a class that setup the board logic

a class that is a TicTacToeButton

a class called TicTacToeMain(the entry point of your program)

 

On a side note, you can also added a class for Player1 and another class for Player2. 

 

Hopefully you can see from my class description that each class sounds like it is an object hence why it is object-oriented.

 

This comes from experience. I must have written so many programs before I learned and adapted into the good OOP style and practice. No book can do a better job than applied experience! You will make mistakes but learn from them! Draw diagrams before coding! Question your design and bugs(this is bound to happen). I ran into so many bugs when I coded Tic-Tac-Toe despite having experience with Java. But I finished it in less than a day's time. You will struggle, but have fun with it. It is programming-the best thing you can do in front of a computer!

 

Best of luck with Tic-Tac-Toe!

Edited by warnexus
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to turn Tic-Tac-Toe or other simple games into a useful exercise I suggest a few steps:

  1. Go ahead and start developing without caring about style and "writer's block".
  2. Finish your game, leaving nothing incomplete or defective. If you have trouble at this point, you need to learn about programming basics or game design, not about OO style.
  3. With the benefit of hindsight, improve and refactor your code to explore the right way to write it.
    Getting someone experienced to review your code and teach you what you did wrong would be vastly better than relying on your insufficient knowledge.
  4. Repeat for a major feature update (e.g. Tic-Tac-Toe with fancy graphical effects) or a new game.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Game management? If you're asking about architecture of game engine, then I would suggest you to get some book what covers the topic. However  some "litlle game" developers usually just starts to code and they refactor and manage the game code during the creation process. I think it's quite heavy way to manage the game engine, but some people does it. Usually they have some minor ideas, which they start to implement to code and little by little they manage to create a whole game.

 

If you are new to coding and game development, the last mentioned way isn't perhaps so bad. It's good way to get to know about the development and coding. Usually you face most general issues when you start from the scratch and by using search pages and books you will get to know about the development quite fast.

 

Design patterns and class diagrams are quite useless, if you don't have even the most general ideas about your game. Usually it's good way to write even some really high level requirements and from there start to develope your software. Requirements -> some analysis method -> static model -> code.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A (classroom) way to get startet with organising your code in a OOP way would be to to write down the details of your game.

 

e.g. TIC TAC TOE:
There is a gameboard.

It is divided into 9 squares.

3 times 3 squares.

The game is played by two players.

One player uses X as marker.

One player uses O as marker.

The player take turns alternating.

The player with three markers in a line wins.

The line can be horizontal, vertical, diagonal.

 

Might have forgotten some things.

 

Now you start looking at the summary you have.

 

There is a gameboard => gameboard class

It is divided into 9 squares. =>  square class

3 times 3 squares. =>  gameboard needs to keep track of 9 squares in 3 times 3 alignment

The game is played by two players. =>  player class

One player uses X as marker. One player uses O as marker. => player class needs to keep track of used marker by player => gameboard needs to store the placed marker and position

The player take turns alternating. => main class / game loop needs information about active player

The player with three markers in a line wins. The line can be horizontal, vertical, diagonal. => main class / game loop needs to check condition every loop.

 

So gameboard class could double as main or game class.

Gets a 3 x 3 datastructure that takes square / tile object

square / tile object gets property playermarker symbol and getter and setter

player object gets properties for playername, playermarker symbol

and so on ....

 

And so you continue until you have everything (entities, functionality, etc.) that is in you game written down and placed in some class / function / functions file.

 

If you are unsure after doing that, you can upload the document / diagramm (UML) here and get feedback.

 

--GWDev

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0