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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Liuqahs15

Why would anyone develop for Ouya?

28 posts in this topic

In androids defence, cell phone development has always been messy, and android did make it much easier.

Which is evident by the explosion of cell phone app development. (There were several options to develop before, also for small companies and bedroom coders)

It's not an easy problem to support such wildly varying devices, in a market that evolves so much, with so many players involved.
 
The only cell phone that isn't (much) of a mess to develop for is the iphone, and the reason is simple, strict control over hardware and ecosystem.
 

Although yes, people were happy to develop for IOS despite sales, either because of perceived future growth, or other reasons

 
It's not that straight forward to read those numbers. You could reach a lot bigger share of that market with lot less cost developing for iOS. Symbian was a lot more segmented market, and did not have a centralised way to sell your apps.

 

As for developing for the Ouya, It's the usual chicken-and-egg problem for a new platform... I guess only time will tell if using android is enough of a boost to bring over enough interesting apps for people to start buying it in enough volume for people to target it directly. Though, since it's such a different platform, many apps and games will be far from trivial to port. And even though the resolution difference isn't that much, they are still made for a much smaller screen, and might not look very good on a big screen without a bit of work.

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If Ouya sells millions then people will develop for it, if it doesn't then don't expect so. Since it's based off the Android platform for some games / apps its just a turn key solution to port it to Ouya ( if they already have an Android app or use a 3rd party cross platform like Unity 3D ). The only question then is it worth going through the Ouya appstore and submission processes and that's a question which boils back down to the user base.

 

I think Ouya has captured some public attention initially but with the coming 4th gen consoles the living room space is too crowded for a set top + console ( blu-ray / game console / entertainment platform etc.. ) + Ouya in the mix even at the 99$ price point. There are 2nd generation "Ouya" like devices coming online already which are even smaller than Ouya  ( about the size of a flash stick ).. then there are TVs which have built in Google TV which can do what Ouya does.. so where does that leave Ouya? Maybe if it had come out 1 year earler before the 4th gen consoles it could have developed a niche a following which might make it a viable platform but as it is, i think its a long shot at best.

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Why would I develop for Ouya?
Because It's just another easy to access marketplace. 
The engine I'm using already supports Win 7, Linux, MacOSX, iOS, Android, BB10 and Playbook.  There are only a couple of tweeks needed to support Ouya.  Really if it doesn't require much work then it's a no brainer.  Every extra marketplace means a different set of potential customers willing to buy apps or click adverts.  This is why a lot of droid developers also release for the Amazon store and other even smaller niche app stores like the B&N Nook store,  Blackberry world, Samsung store etc..

If you want to make money as an indie it's all about getting those extra few customers to play your game.  If you are a droid developer I am never going to play your current game (I own an iPhone) but if you port it to Ouya then you may have an extra sale because at the Ouyas price point it'd be rude not to buy one.   Even if they bring out one every year It's still cheap (same price as two AAA xbox games) and is an interesting piece of hardware to hack.

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I bought into the Ouya because I don't like where mainstream consoles are heading with multiplayer functionality. If I wanted to be by myself, staring into a bright screen in a dark room and yelling at strangers over the Internet, I'd play a game on my computer. I miss being able to yell at friends who are sitting on the couch next to me.

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