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Is it worth applying for this?

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Hello everyone,
 
I finished a BSc in Computer Science about 18 months ago, and took some time out to play with Game Dev (and just to take some time out, always wanted a gap year bla bla). I'm not a particularly experienced C programmer, so I've been working in Haxe NME, and I've produced a couple of prototypes in that, and my current project is nearly at a releasable level (In code terms anyway, I'm not an art or sound guy, which is what's really holding it back; It sucks working alone!) On my CV I say I have "Some C/C++ experience," which is true, a University module taught me the basics and I completed a few small exercises for that.
 
Anyway, moneys running low so I need some form of employment. I sent off to a few generic C#/Java jobs and web dev jobs, and figured I'd send speculative applications to the local game studios, asking for entry-level/graduate programming or QA/test roles. If I got offered a job by one of them I almost don't care what it is, because its a foot in the door of where I want to be.
 
I got a response from one the next day saying they were looking for a C# programmer, and to check the attached description. "If you can code in C# and this role is of interest please do let me know," the email saidThe description is titled "Games Software Engineer" and seems to be focused on test: "You will be involved in defining the scope of test automation across the studio, which will in part entail designing, implementing and driving the implementation of a testing framework within the core code in parallel with the game development team.  This framework will be used for metrics collection and driving game automation."
 
It also mentions C/C++ - "Ability to read, design and write C/C++ and C# coding solutions." - and there's a huge list of expected responsibilities and essential experience etc (focused around test plans, principles, and some stuff like "Proven track record in identifying the need for and implementing process improvement") which makes it seem not like a graduate/entry-level role to me.
 
Most of the text of what I was sent seems to be here: http://www.brookstreet.co.uk/Professional/VacancyDetails.asp?ID=26385723, with the exception that mine has a section of "Personal attributes/Interpersonal skills", a qualifications section at the end which just lists "B.S. Degree in Computer Science, design, engineering or equivalent work experience," and a further long section of "Key Success Criteria."
 
Is it even worth me replying? Haha. I'm really not sure they looked at my CV or read the email body before sending that to me!
 
And if it is worth applying, can anyone tell me what I should actually be learning/looking at/doing to fulfill some of these requirements? I used JUnit a bit at Uni, and got an overview of common test methodologies too, but that list of stuff is worryingly long and obtuse.
 
Thanks smile.png
~ fe

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Is it even worth me replying?

Yes, at least you will get some experiences. Honestly, if they seek more experienced people, they will let you know (e.g. they don't reply tongue.png  ). If they build a new team to make a testing framework, they will most likely look for an expert (you know, 30 years experiences, soft skills, still young, low salary ...), but there are chances that they although look for rookie (=inexpensive) coders (=coding monkeys) to build up this team. When you get in touch with there core game technology, you can learn a lot from this position...

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I'd reply. There's not only a question of hiring the person that fits the definition, oftentimes a developer is willing to hire someone that may not be defacto for this role for a number of reasons, not limited to:

- time is critical: they need someone to do it now, and can't wait until they find the rare gem. They might cut you some slack and provide more mentoring to help out.

- they favor attitude: they need someone that fits in the team more than they need someone with the experience. Possibly, they have mentoring available and are seeking to expand with the RIGHT candidate by judging from a different angle (see Valve)

etc.

 

Might be interesting... or might turn out bad, but eitherway you'll learn something in the process!

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Go for it. The worst that can happen is no response. The least that will likely happen is some degree of callback, phone-screen, or interview loop, and in the best case, you land a gig.

 

As someone entering the workforce (it sounds like), simply experiencing the process as far as you are able will be worthwhile in and of itself. Navigating job postings and performing well during callbacks, screens, and interviews are all important skills to develop -- they're as important as your technical skills.

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Yes it is definatly worth applying to get your foot in the door.  Apply for this job and get your foot in the door.  Even if you go to the interview and don't get the job just having the interview is invaluable experience.

However one thing to be careful of is applying for jobs through high street agencies like brook street.  If you are looking for any IT jobs then go through specific IT recruiters.  They have a better understanding of what the company is looking for and won't waste your time or the companys time by sending you to interviews that you are not suited for.

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However one thing to be careful of is applying for jobs through high street agencies like brook street.  If you are looking for any IT jobs then go through specific IT recruiters.  They have a better understanding of what the company is looking for and won't waste your time or the companys time by sending you to interviews that you are not suited for.

 

 

 

 

I didn't apply through that link, I contacted the studio directly and they responded with a job description which is identical (but a bit longer) to the one at that link.

 

I did respond just saying "I'd love to be considered for the position" basically, and now I wait for... something... else... to... happen...

 

 

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I didn't apply through that link...I did respond just saying "I'd love to be considered for the position" basically, and now I wait for... something... else... to... happen...

 

It would have been better to say, "great. Here is my resume and a link to my portfolio. Please consider this my application for the position."

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I agree with Tom here.

They've opened you a door, and you've basically just went back to the system.

In other words, you were extended a situation where someone has taken notice of you and have seen you as a potential solution to one of their problems (a different position they need filled and they believe you could fill for them) and you've turned yourself back in a serial joe, in a system.

Depending on the size of the company, this may reduce your chances of getting this job (especially if there's a large amount of HRs/applications/openings).

 

But yes, now, you can only wait...

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I sent them my CV with the initial speculative email which includes portfolio links, I also included a portfolio link in my cover letter/message in the first email body. I kind of assumed they would consider that my application! Should I have resent the CV?

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If they had already shut the door on you, you couldn’t get any lower than sending your CV etc.  What can they do?  Shut the door twice?

If they had not shut the door on you, compared to your initial reply this one would be much more professional.  In this case it could go either way, but it probably doesn’t leave you worse-off than your previous situation.

 

I can’t say that your chances increased, so you should also be applying to as many other companies as you can.

Subscribe to the Mary-Margaret Network for monthly job postings.  They post a lot of jobs every month so you should be able to find something.

 

 

L. Spiro 

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I sent them my CV with the initial speculative email which includes portfolio links, I also included a portfolio link in my cover letter/message in the first email body. I kind of assumed they would consider that my application! Should I have resent the CV?

 

No. You didn't tell us this part when you first told the story, so in my reply, I didn't know this.  You have applied. Now you have to move on and apply to other companies. If this company decides they want to interview you, they'll let you know. 

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