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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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hpdvs2

Roles and Tasks needed in video game development.

29 posts in this topic

Well, that reinforces the idea of making organizational decisions primarily on tasks, once again.

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Absolutely agreed.  One of my first chapters is "David an Goliath" which discusses the common differences in resources/experience between typical Indie teams and game giants.  Particularly focusing on how to develop again that doesn't compete directly, but takes advantage of features that the Game Giants did not use in their popular genre matching games. (games in the same genre as you are working in)

 

I my have useful information. I'm one of the last of the lone wolf developers. In 1988 I invented the Star Trek flight simulator genre with my first game SIMTrek, which was a top 10 download on AOL (10,000+ DL's the first week). I've now been building games on and off for 25 years. I'm intimately familiar with the tactics and strategies a David needs to survive. needless to say, as a lone wolf, I do it all, AI and animation, i write the sales copy, and the shopping cart software. register the trade name, and take out the trash. Write the music, and field the tech support calls from users. What you don't know, you learn, or give up on your project.

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I'm intimately familiar with the tactics and strategies a David needs to survive. needless to say, as a lone wolf, I do it all, AI and animation, i write the sales copy, and the shopping cart software. register the trade name, and take out the trash. Write the music, and field the tech support calls from users. What you don't know, you learn, or give up on your project.

 

Seeing as that is another are in my book I wanted to address, I've posted a forum question on David vs Goliath.  I'd love to hear your take on it, http://www.gamedev.net/topic/638733-david-and-goliath-how-do-you-compete-with-a-game-giant/

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EXCELLENT!  That makes a lot of sense.  Then, for the sections, I can post it more by size of whats covered/general.  I.e. a programmers section, then an AI programmers section, etc...   that at the end, include a list of tasks that are more stand alone, one task roles.  So far, I think I'm going to use this approach.  (unless I hear something that sounds better to me)

 

Probably the thing to do is get the list of tasks together first. Once you have that, odds are: "how to divide it up into sections and subsections" will be pretty self evident. 

 

Casual thought brings to mind obvious sections like:

coding

artwork  (i like the umbrella/generic term "video" - all the stuff you see on the screen)

sound and music (generic term: audio)

other content (level maps, mission orders, storyline text, etc)

testing

marketing

support

 

and obvious subsections like graphics, AI, physics, and simulation/modeling  for coding, 

level designer, modeler, animator etc for artwork, and so on.

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Dan,

it occurred to me you might want to slice it as tasks, and skill sets, where the basic skill set would include things like designer, coder, artist, writer, etc.

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