• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
eileenery1992

2D or 3D for my first RPG?

9 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm completely a noob in game development. I want to make an RPG that has to be completed within this semester. Considering that I still have other classes, my time commitment for this project is limited. I understand that 3D means a lot more work than 2D, but how much more? Can I even make anything with 3D? We have 3 people in our team. One of them is really good at 2D digital art, but none of us have substantial experience with 3D graphics, so we will have to start from 0 if we want to do 3D. Any estimate/advice would be greatly appreciated!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're going for an RPG you might also want to consider a pre-made engine like RPGMaker or some such (unless of course the assignment is to program your own...). You'll be able to focus on scripting, writing, music, and art that way instead of pointers, bitmap formats, and serialization.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to 2D. 2D is already a time commitment in itself. It will challenge your ability to solve problems. You rather have a project that you can finish on time than a delayed project that requires MUCH MORE of a time sink to get done than 2D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that 3D means a lot more work than 2D, but how much more?

I'm a 3D artist and it took me months to master the skills that I needed to model/texture/animate/light a scene/etc. I think what you should do is plan on making a 2D game and try 3D modeling just so you can see what it is about. Its a bit complex.

 

I don't think you would have time to complete the project in 3D :(.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go 2d, since it is a lot easier to create the art and you avoid a lot of troubles with collisions and camera.

 

Still, you can also mix them. For instance, if you want more detailed animations (3d characters on a 2d world) or environment (2d character on a 3d world). If you want to check the end result, soma bringer is a nintendo DS action RPG that uses 3d characters on a 2d world and Ragnarok Online is a MMORPG that uses 2d sprites for characters in a 3D world.

 

Good luck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3D art and programming is only as complicated as you make it.

3D content isn't really harder or more time consuming than 2D. It has lots of advantages to save time.

-It's easy to build up a bunch of low poly templates and use them to create environments quickly.

-Follow Peter's Massive Blender Tutorial on Youtube to learn how to make simple player models. Once you have 1 nice model, you can animate a skeleton and build up a library of animations. You can keep modifying your base character to make new ones, and they acquire the entire set of animations automatically.

Want to get started quickly? Rig a minecraft-like box character to your skeleton. That's 15 minutes of work tops.

2D is a whole different workflow. You want a new character in a 2D game? You have to to start from scratch and animate everything again on a new sprite sheet. In 3D if you want to introduce a fat guy with red hair, you just scale out the belly, move a few polygons around, and then modify a texture map and then save or your new character. Even the texture is easy to make. Bake in the vertex colors and ambient occlusion, then just add in the details in your paint app.

You want to add a new action for all your characters to do? Now you have to go back add them to every sprite sheet which will take forever. In 3D you just add the animation onto your shared skeleton and everyone can use it automatically.

-As for the programming, there is no reason it has to be any different. A game with 3D graphics doesn't mean it has 3D logic. A tile based 2D RPG and a tile based 3D rpg work the exact same. Camera is overhead and the character does simple tile / box collision. The hard parts aren't the graphics of which dimension, it's the scenario setup, the inventory system, the battle rules and AI, etc... Edited by Daaark
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0