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converting to VBOs with glDrawElements from immediate mode

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This draws a box.

 

     glBegin ( GL_LINE_STRIP );
        glVertex2i ( x0, y0 );
        glVertex2i ( x1, y0 );
        glVertex2i ( x1, y1 );
        glVertex2i ( x0, y1 );
        glVertex2i ( x0, y0 );
    glEnd ();
 

Now, to convert it to use VBO I have done

 

 

    GLint vertices[] = {x0,y0,x1,y0,x1,y1,x0,y1,x0,y0 };
    unsigned int indices[] = {0, 1, 2, 3,0};

    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, buffers[0]);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(vertices), vertices, GL_DYNAMIC_DRAW);

    glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glVertexPointer(2, GL_INT, 0, NULL);
    glDrawElements(GL_LINE_STRIP, 5, GL_UNSIGNED_INT, indices);
    glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
 

 

I must be doing something stupid, since it isn't working.  Instead of a box, it isn't drawing anything visable.

Not getting any GL errors either.

I can toggle the code above to go back to old code, and it works as it should.

 

 

 

Where did I mess up ?

Edited by Clancy

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vertices is a pointer which means that sizeof(vertices) will always be 4 or 8, what you want is something like 4*sizeof(GLint).

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vertices is a pointer which means that sizeof(vertices) will always be 4 or 8, what you want is something like 4*sizeof(GLint).

No, vertices is an array and sizeof(vertices) correctly returns its size.

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No, vertices is an array and sizeof(vertices) correctly returns its size.

If you do something like this: GLint vertices[] = {x0y0x1y0x1y1x0y1x0y0};

the value of "vertices" will be the address of the first element and the [index] operator does not do anything else but some pointer arithmetic to access the elements. You can access the first element as *vertices. vertices should have the type GLint* and sizeof should return the according size.

If I am wrong, I will of course accept that, but that would kinda destroy everything I thought understood about programming...

 

Edit: Okay, I googled and tried it myself and actually sizeof returns the correct array size :)

Edited by _Slin_

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No, vertices is an array and sizeof(vertices) correctly returns its size.

If you do something like this: GLint vertices[] = {x0y0x1y0x1y1x0y1x0y0};

the value of "vertices" will be the address of the first element and the [index] operator does not do anything else but some pointer arithmetic to access the elements. You can access the first element as *vertices. vertices should have the type GLint* and sizeof should return the according size.

If I am wrong, I will of course accept that, but that would kinda destroy everything I thought understood about programming...

 

Why not printf sizeof (vertices) and find out?  But Brother Bob is right; if it was *vertices it would be different of course.

 

The OP's code looks correct to me, assuming that buffers[0] is a valid buffer object name created via glGenBuffers (if that's not the case then there's the problem).  An outside possibility is a driver bug causing problems with a GL_INT vertex type; maybe try changing that to floats and see if the problem reproduces?  Another test might be to use:

 

glBegin (GL_LINE_STRIP);
glArrayElement (0);
glArrayElement (1);
glArrayElement (2);
glArrayElement (3);
glArrayElement (0);
glEnd ();

That's functionally equivalent tothe glDrawElements call but - just using it as a test - may help to shed some light on what's happening here.

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vertices is the array itself, not a pointer to the first element. There are many places where the array can decay into a pointer, which is the primary source of confusion in situations like this. But in the end, an array is not a pointer, nor is a pointer an array. Both can be subscripted, both can be used in a pointer contexts (such as passing an array to a function that expects a pointer, in which the pointer-decay I mentioned takes place), but they are distinct types.

 

Try this for example:

int main()
{
    int foo1[] = {1, 2, 3};
    int *foo2 = foo1;

    std::cout << "type=" << typeid(foo1).name() << ", size=" << sizeof(foo1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "type=" << typeid(foo2).name() << ", size=" << sizeof(foo2) << std::endl;
}

This is what VS2012 for x64 shows for me:

type=int [3], size=12
type=int * __ptr64, size=8

It shows that the array has the type of three integers and the size of three integers, and that the pointer is of pointer type and is the size of a pointer. The assignment of foo1 to foo2 demonstrates how the array decays into a pointer and is thus a valid assignment.

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The OP's code looks correct to me, assuming that buffers[0] is a valid buffer object name created via glGenBuffers (if that's not the case then there's the problem). An outside possibility is a driver bug causing problems with a GL_INT vertex type; maybe try changing that to floats and see if the problem reproduces? Another test might be to use:



glBegin (GL_LINE_STRIP);
glArrayElement (0);
glArrayElement (1);
glArrayElement (2);
glArrayElement (3);
glArrayElement (0);
glEnd ();

That's functionally equivalent tothe glDrawElements call but - just using it as a test - may help to shed some light on what's happening here.

glGenBuffers I use is correct, not really sure how anyone can screw that up. ;)

 

However, using your little example with glArrayElement  *does* work.

 

So, I guess I am chasing a driver issue of some kind... though, I need to get back to my main machine to test, instead of this crappy laptop that has intel HD3000 in it.

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