• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Nicholas Kong

Question about Eclipse, JDK, JVM and JRE

5 posts in this topic

I have a question about Eclipse, JDK, JRE and JVM. From what I understand so far.

 

 

Eclipse compiles your source code and runs your program

 

The JDK has a compiler called javac that turns your java source code into java byte code. 

 

JVM- a machine that acts like a real computer that runs your java byte code.

 

JRE- this is where all the available classes in the JAVA API is located in

 

In the event if a computer does not have the JVM, where does the user actually find one? Is the JVM in a processor chip or microprocessor because in wikiapedia, it said intel x86 jvm. So I was confused about this.

 

I'm sure this post will help people who are starting new to Java who questions why they need to install these things. happy.png 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eclipse; an editor and build-management environment.

 

JVM: Java Virtual Machine: the program, implemented differently for different platforms, that runs the java bytecode created by the compiler.

 

JRE: Java Runtime Environment. Usually the Oracle or GNU implementation. Contains a JVM and the standard library implementation, but no editors or compilers. It's meant to provide a complete but only sufficient runtime environment.

 

JDK: Java Development Kit: the JRE, plus a compiler.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not entirely sure about this, but i think this is correct:

 

Eclise is an IDE (Integration Developing(Developer) Environment. It has a text editor (where you code), sintax highlighting, etc.

 

JDK (Java Development Kit) - This is the Java equivalent to a SDK (Software Development Kit). It allows you to compile and create java programs into Java bytecode (.jar files).

You'd normally download this in conjunction with Eclipse or NetBeans (the IDEs normally allow you to download a bundle of IDE + JDK).

 

JRE (Java Runtime Environment) is needed fr running the JVM (Java Virtual Machine). Since Java is an interpreted language, it need the JVM to translate the Java bytecode into machine instructions (which can be x86, x86-64, PowerPC, etc). You can think of JRE being similar, in purpose, to Adobe Flash Player (without which you cannot play videos on the Youtube, etc).

 

If the user doesn't have the JRE, it can be downloaded for free in the Sun website (you just Google jre, and it will appear).

 

So JDK is only needed for who develops Java applications, and JRE is needed to run them.

 

Hope it helps.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eclipse; an editor and build-management environment.

 

JVM: Java Virtual Machine: the program, implemented differently for different platforms, that runs the java bytecode created by the compiler.

 

JRE: Java Runtime Environment. Usually the Oracle or GNU implementation. Contains a JVM and the standard library implementation, but no editors or compilers. It's meant to provide a complete but only sufficient runtime environment.

 

JDK: Java Development Kit: the JRE, plus a compiler.

Thanks for the explanation. rolleyes.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "byte code" is called an intermediary code between the source and the code that will get executed in your computer.

 

Your code gets translated to this intermediate language that the Java Virtual Machine understands. Its kinda a pseudo assembler, but instead of having x86 instructions, you have instructions for the JVM (think of it as a virtual processor which runs on top of your CPU).

 

The difference is that while assembly is compiled into an executable and runs directly on the CPU, the java byte code gets executed by the JVM. So this JVM translates the byte code into something the CPU in your computer can understand.

 

While on conventional languages you'd be compiling a separate executable for each architecture you're targeting (ie, one for x86, other for x86_64, etc), with managed languages (Java, C#, etc) you compile all the programs for a single target, the Virtual Machine, so you don't have to worry about the actual architecture which your program might get run on. Often you don't even have to worry about which OS your program gets run on either since developers try to abstract OS API specific calls in the standard libraries (say, you don't have to know how to create a window in Windows/OSX/Linux to create a window using Swing in Java).

 

The JVM does needs to be architecture specific since its the program in charge of actually running your Java bytecode in the environment of the user (CPU+OS). So you can't use a JVM for powerpc in a x86 CPU. The user has to install a working JVM to use your program (and any other program compiled for the JVM).

 

That's probably the main selling point of it. But as always, things aren't that simple and there are many ups and downs about using managed vs conventional languages. So beware of "what is better? C# or C++?" kind of questions because there isn't a simple all-encompassing answer for such things.

Edited by TheChubu
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JDK (Java Development Kit) - This is the Java equivalent to a SDK (Software Development Kit). It allows you to compile and create java programs into Java bytecode (.jar files).
You'd normally download this in conjunction with Eclipse or NetBeans (the IDEs normally allow you to download a bundle of IDE + JDK).

 

That's almost correct. The JDK is the *official* sdk. There are other packages out there that are not the JDK, but that allow you to develop java programs. And Eclipse does not use the JDK. It ships with its own compiler. It does, however, require the JRE be installed on the system.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0