• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Wickedrob

What exactly is paid for when making games?

11 posts in this topic

Everything related to running a company.. support staff, the developers, artists, so on. There's a reason for big games especially the budget can be in the millions of dollars range, most of that just goes to salaries, travel expenses, software licenses and such.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides all that has been mentioned, marketing makes up for a large share of the budget.

Edited by tomthetoyboy
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

electricity is not free, imagine how much the bill is after all the computer use to developer a game...

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It up to you, if you run your own game studio, you can make money, or you can make small games such as temple run, if you put your hardork in it you can do it alone. i can do most of thing alone except scripting.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides the software itself.

Actually, the software is often free.

 

What you pay for is the time of the people who develop the software, the time of artists who create the assets, the time of support and management staff who keep this working smoothly, the time of the sales and marketing staff who get the product out to consumers, the time of the legal and accounting staff who look after the interactions with other businesses and the various authorities.  Some payments go to the physical plant (office space, electricity and internet), capital (computers, private jets, money), and the aforementioned authorities who take their cut.

 

Some small amount of payments may go to purchasing software, although that is usually included in the captial account along with the hardware it runs on: some licensed software can be accounted for under monthly or annual expenditures.

 

At the end of the day, if there is anything left over, payments called dividends go to the business owners.

 

Is there any reason to believe making games works differently than any other business?

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The general formula for a startup in the US is $10,000 per month per employee. This is the normal business plan estimate. It covers not just salary, but also support costs such as IT and servers and internet and so on, hardware, software, support staff, facilities and utilities, and everything else.

There isn't really a specific line-item expense listing, every company is going to be a little different.

 

I didn't know that. $10,000 sounds really really low for a tech startup, unless you've got fewer than 8 people or something. That's interesting

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The general formula for a startup in the US is $10,000 per month per employee. This is the normal business plan estimate. It covers not just salary, but also support costs such as IT and servers and internet and so on, hardware, software, support staff, facilities and utilities, and everything else.

There isn't really a specific line-item expense listing, every company is going to be a little different.

 
I didn't know that. $10,000 sounds really really low for a tech startup, unless you've got fewer than 8 people or something. That's interesting


thats $10.000 per employee and month, so at 8 employees its $80.000 per month ($960.000 per year)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

electricity is not free, imagine how much the bill is after all the computer use to developer a game...

Not sure why this is rated down, but at all of my jobs, we've often been harassed by management about not leaving on PC's and other equipment overnight unless absolutely necessary. Whenever money is tight, before making people redundant or cutting the coffee supplies, the first event seems to be asking everyone to be conscious of energy efficiency.

Electricity is a very expensive resource in my country, and it's possible for every person's desk to be drawing ~0.5-1 kW of power...

e.g. at a tariff of 35c per kWh, 20 staff, 1kW per desk and 8 hour days, you're looking at $1200/month just to keep your equipment on.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0