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Wickedrob

What arent you good at drawing?

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I draw like a 2nd grader...okay 1st grader but I'm very passionate and I hope to get as good as I can.
There's some actual really good artist on this site and I was wondering what were some of problems you guys run into or just have difficulty drawing

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I had trouble with people for a long time, and I'm still not very good at faces.  Also my shading sucks, as does my (lack of) ability to use a harmonious palette for a more complicated painting or character with background.

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Anatomy, Likeness (as in someone's facial features) capturing movement, moving beyond the sketch into a polished piece, line art, architecture...

Seems like the better I become, the more I realize I need to improve. Kind of like science, as soon as you solve one problem, 10 more pop in it's place.

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One problem I face is shading. I understand the concepts and when I actually do it, I'm pretty good at it, but I usually don't just because I prefer to work very quickly or get requests for cartoon stuff.

 

In order to help me combat my lack of shading if a piece calls for it, I only do very light lines (or use a guide layer if purely digital) to help with the shape then I use shading exclusively to flesh out the illustration. I also try to illustrate in a more painterly fashion; to block out shapes with my brush and have little to no lines while adding detail with light and shadow.

 

If you'd like to improve your drawing skills, I'd suggest trying new things like getting a fat-tipped felt marker (and some thick paper so it doesn't bleed through too bad) and try to draw something you see without taking the marker off the paper. Also, try going faster and don't stress too much over making your lines perfect.

 

Oh and maybe watch some youtube videos of artists drawing stuff. It doesn't need to be tutorial videos because they take longer, but just watching some artwork get made will help you to see their process and might teach you a couple of tricks.biggrin.png

 

I guess that's just some advice I can give. 

Good luck!

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I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.

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I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.

Well, some people are "visual learners" and some aren't, if that's what you mean.  There are people who have mild mental or physical problems that interfere with drawing, and they might not even realize it.  Dyspraxia is a learning disability related to motor skills, there are an assortment of visual perception and processing disorders, physical eye problems which mess with depth perception or color perception, and physical hand/muscle problems like palsy and arthritis which mess with executing fine motor skills.  Oh, and the genetic balance of fast twitch to slow twitch muscles.

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I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.

 

Almost nobody can draw a straight line on a piece of paper. The ability to do so is not the mark of an artist.

 

I see drawing to be a lot like writing, or really any sort of creative endeavor. I think that a lot more people can do it than think they can. Sure, you'll need a lot of inborn "talent" to be great, and sure some people are going to be extremely bad, but I believe that the vast majority of people fall in between these two extremes, and that no matter how bad you think you may be there is always the possibility for improvement.

 

It just takes work, that's all. First, forget about how bad you are, forget about how badly you want to be good. Just pick up a pencil and draw what you see. If it looks like shit, ball it up and chuck it in the fireplace, grab another sheet and try again. The good artists are the ones that hang in there until their stuff stops looking so much like shit. That's the big secret.

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I hate when people say or think you have to be talented to draw. Its an instant dismissal of all the hard work any artists puts into his work. like it was effortless and required no work to get where they are.

 

I am just a beginner but I have seen improvement just from practicing. you can too.

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I have some kind of bizarre mental block against drawing people. Walking mass of psychological complexes that I am, any attempt at doing so--if, by some miracle, I manage to bring myself to actually let the pen touch the paper--will be immediately followed by compulsively destroying the inevitably failed drawing. I... really need to get over that, but I have no idea how.

 

I'm bad at animals, too. No particular psychological complex at work there, I've just never really practiced and they turn out poorly. Except insects. Somehow, they just make sense to me.

 

Landscapes, buildings, objects--no problem. I actually got my first degree in architecture (protip: don't get a degree in architecture), and have been known to undertake the occasional large-scale (24x36"+) drawing of various interesting buildings (I particularly enjoy gothic architecture and intricate stonework). Perspective usually isn't a problem, and I've found various ways of coping with anything particularly complex (my go-to method being to simply model a similar generic shape in 3D and use it as a guide).

 

I actually shade compulsively, usually with a pen. I stick with physical paper notes rather than my laptop in my grad school classes for this reason--the margins of each page end up completely filled with gradients and assorted 3D objects long before the page itself. It's practically an addiction, and I tend get strange looks from classmates.

 

Almost nobody can draw a straight line on a piece of paper. The ability to do so is not the mark of an artist.

 

Heh, I had a professor that could do the DaVinci thing, where you hold your arm straight out and draw a perfect circle on a chalkboard. He could also write in a nearly flawless gothic font, backwards, and in a shockingly accurate spiral. It was pretty impressive. But no, he wasn't born with that ability--the guy kept a pencil in his hand all day, every day, and had for most of his life.

Edited by TheSasquatch

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Personally, I'm iffy with perspectives (3-point especially), some architecture, and likenesses, as Hamsta said. For some reason, realistic mouths and eyes allude me, and so a lot of my style avoids that. I still try and practice it, but I certainly don't publish it.
But I think what I am worst at above anything else is CARS. I don't know why, but I have NEVER drawn a good car in my life, unless it's an antique car like a Ford Model T. I feel like it just has something to do with the smoothness of it all.  Without any really clear lines to define it, I can never quite get the shape right given my perspective; and even if I do, I'm still not accustomed to the design/features of them.

As for the conversation that seems to be going around about being good at art:
Honestly, I'm not all too good. I am however, proud of what I can do - which is more or less 12 years of my childhood absently doodling and reading up about things I wasn't sure of. If I had to say anything on the fact, is that to get better, there really is no easy way. I see tons of people who don't try and expect it to be handed to them. I sincerely doubt anyone was born able to draw some of the amazing art you see on the Internet today.

Just practice, be patient, look to life, and don't rush your work. Make stupid faces in the mirror and draw them as a smiley face so that you can get emotion. Discover proportionality. Look up tutorials for pretty much anything you want. Make comic strips - it'll make your characters more consistent. Review every doodle you make to see what can be better. No matter how you practice - so long as you're practicing - you WILL get better. You can strive to be like one of those amazing artists, just don't expect it to come instantly.

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