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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Rick Leunisse

Not a gamedev, but could really use some feedback from gamedevs

6 posts in this topic

My name is Rick Leunisse and I'm the founder of http://www.gamersuggestions.com. My goal for Gamersuggestions is to bridge the gap between gamers and game developers. I want to create a platform where gamers can easily provide feedback on games and developers.

 

At the moment gamers can post suggestions for games and the community will rank them using a like/dislike system. This way developers can see in the blink of an eye which changes gamers want. I'm also working on changing our review system to an after sales review system. Gamers can rate several aspects post release, for example the current online experience, quality of patches/updates/dlc and how good the developer communicates. 

 

Although I have gained some traction among gamers it is hard for me to get in contact with developers. I really hope you guys would like to take a look at my website and provide some feedback. Do you like the general idea? What kind of info/data would you like to get if you use my website? Do you have any ideas on how to get the interest of developers? Thank you in advance! 

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To add to what frob said: you should start now on attending game conferences and trade shows. And not just in small ways, either. A booth would be pretty essential to making your site known to the industry.

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I'm skeptical of the benefit of your site versus a game's own forums (or public gaming forums that already have critical mass).

The reason I say this is that fans of a game are already going to the game's forums to make suggestions, complaints, and discuss your game. These fans ARE the community for the game, not some generic community that is interested in ranking game suggestions and may or not be interested (or have a vested interest) in actually improving the game in question.

Also, after working in the industry for a lot of years and experiencing tons of what I guess would be called focus tests (and surfing forums for years and years), in general the average gamers' ideas for improving games are 99% of the time absolute garbage. There are very few gamers out there who actually have good ideas that are well thought through and realistic.

With that said, smaller companies that can't afford to hire community managers or host their own sites might find the service useful. But if your site doesn't have a large number of gamers interested in their game, how useful is the service?
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I have to agree with skepticism of guys above. Since fans of certain games just write on certain games forums, the only strength you could have on the market if your site had some kind of organised general feedback for each genre. A site that would answer the question "what do RPG players want?" in just one or two clicks, without the need to browse through all the posts and ideas in the forums. That would unfortunately mean a serious site redesign. Also, you have to keep in mind, that ideas that gamers have are often very abstract and implementing them usually means more work than it's worth.

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Thank you guys for your honest feedback. The main difference between online forums is that our feedback is way more structured. Especially the forums with a lot of fans have become really chaotic with thousands of topics. It is hard for a communtiy manager to see which suggestions really have the support of the community (a big topic could also mean there is a lot of disagreement).

 

The real value for a developer is in showing that they listen and interact with the community. Developers earn points for interaction (also for rejecting suggestions). For gamers it is really important that a developer listens to a community and at our site developers can show that and even compare that to other developers.

 

I'm also working on filters/categories to make it easier to find suggestions on certain topics.

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