• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
SiddharthBhat

What's everyone doing with Angelscript!

15 posts in this topic

Hi all!

 

Being pretty new to programming (and Angelscript in general), I'm wondering for what purposes everyone's using Angelscript :)

 

I've been using it for around 3-4 months now for my 2d game engine.

 

What about you guys?

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

I'm new to Angelscript too (and many years of c++), and it's the first time I use a script language so I can't compare it to another, but I'm totally satisfied of this one.

 

I'm searching a script engine for my 3D tool to manage some game logic and some animations,  I'm very happy of the result, it works perfectly and it is very fast, so thanks to Andreas Jonsson ;)

 

here a presentation of my project : http://irrlicht.sourceforge.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=48064&p=276937#p276937

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey! 

 

I use AngelScript for a large amount of months already. I use it as the scripting engine for my game engine, running on every platform. It features a powerful scripting API for making awesome games that run immediately in all browsers(like FLASH), all desktop platforms , android and iOS :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am working on a nodal graphical software Photo-Reactor and after three days of messing with the angelscript, I am 100% positive this will become a great part of the software.

I previously contemplated to write my own bytecode interpreter as nothing I found was suitable and I need both 32 and 64 bit version. I am absolutely glad I spent the time looking around, the angelscript is exactly what I was after. Big kudos to Andreas. The angelscript is a beast. What I love the most is that it is c/c++ syntax and it is brilliantly plug-and-play.

More about the project:

http://www.mediachance.com/reactor/index.html

 

interface4.jpg

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks really neat. Do let me know when the scriptable version is available so I can add a link to it on my users' list. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The script works like a charm in the development version (plugged it all today). I started from your texture generator demo, creating similar image class, not realizing the library changed a bit from there... but I got my bearings very quickly.

 

One thing I would like to have more explained is the typing convention with the reference sign @.

say you have

void function(image @img)
{...}
 
image@ img = @image(200,200);
 
function(@img);
 
is this @ on the function(@img) just for convention? Because it works as function(img) as well.
 
Same with the 
image@ img = @image(200,200);
omitting the @ from the front of image(200,200) works as well and seems to not do anything different, but is there any difference or it is all for convention?
 

[attachment=15627:angelscript.jpg]

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In most cases the compiler will be able to implicitly add the @, as it knows that what is expected is the address or handle of the object rather than the value. You'll need to be careful with the @ for the left hand value in assignments. Without the @ symbol you're doing a value assignment and with the @ symbol you're doing a handle assignment.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I do understand the left hand requirement, I just got surprised by the @ on right side of assignment. Anyway, it is logical.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a chemical engineer working for Eastman Chemical Company.  We develop a software tool which we use for chemical process control and simulation.  Our software allows users to write scripts to support their simulations and enable custom models or calculations.  We were using Microsoft's scripting engine (VBScript and JScript), but we never liked the language and were not impressed with the effort required to expose our object model through the script.

 

Microsoft appeared to have some bugs in the latest version of their scripting engine, which ships with Internet Explorer.  We didn't have control over the distribution of the scripting engine and were having too much trouble making our application work between versions.  We started looking for a replacement, and it was looking like we were going to implement Google's V8 engine or Mozilla's SpiderMonkey.... until we stumbled upon AngelScript.

 

AngelScript has almost everything we need, and the source is very readable.  Thanks Andreas!

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0