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george7378

'averaging out' the colour of a texture?

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Hi everyone,

 

I'm working with this water texture:

 

waterMain_zpsb30f2c7c.png

 

However, it doesn't look great when I tile it in-game, because of the fact that it has light and dark colour highlights across it, which are quite clearly visible when tiled.

 

Does anyone know how I could remove those light and dark differences and average out the blue colour, using GIMP or paint.net?

 

Thanks!

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You can use GIMP's tone curve editor to cut off values above a certain threshold.

 

Because the highlights make up all of the finer detail in the picture, simply blurring and then darkening it slightly should also work.

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What you're looking for its called a high and low pass filter I think. Though I don't know where to find one. High pass filter should cut the dark areas, low pass filter should cut the brighter areas.

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First thing, I would try making it grayscale to isolate the tonal differences without having to worry about color values, and use those filters and mess with the histogram. You can then go back and colorize is back to blue fairly trivially.

 

I would offer more specific advice but my laptop is waiting on a new AC adapter so I can't really experiment...

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Here's what I got by converting to gray scale and evening out that section of pixel values (make all pixel values between value A and value B the same). And then going back and "colorizing" it back to blue. Not perfect, but shows you what you can do:

 

[attachment=13953:Watertexture.png]

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Prinz Eugn, that's just the hard way of using the curves tool I posted about above.

 

I don't think so, since the dark values and light values are also different hues, meaning you'll have to adjust each channel's histogram in order to get even color. Making it grayscale just removes that part of the equation so you're only dealing with absolute value, not juggling value and hue.

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Prinz Eugn, that's just the hard way of using the curves tool I posted about above.

 
I don't think so, since the dark values and light values are also different hues, meaning you'll have to adjust each channel's histogram in order to get even color. Making it grayscale just removes that part of the equation so you're only dealing with absolute value, not juggling value and hue.


You just move the curve into a straight line on 'value mode'. Then you can adjust the rest by eye if you want to go deeper.

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