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Woland

Breaking into industry without coding or art skills.

31 posts in this topic

It might be just the way I was raised, but I think broader perspective is always a good thing. Whether you want to stay in your hometown or travel to other continents - knowing only about your hometown is just silly.

Edited by Woland
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This might be reducing the statements made in the original post, but because there's disagreement and ambiguity with what is really programming and what is art, the point might be made simpler by saying "I want to break into the industry without very focused left-brain or right-brain skills".

 

You may not call a writer's job making art, but it does require creative thinking, just like an visual artist. So it's mainly a right-brain skill. Scripting requires a good understanding of logic like programming, a left-brain skill.

 

So to put it another way, we are looking to get down to the jobs that are more of a balance, a more moderate use of both sides of the brain for those that do not really excel at either.

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I've worked at three large studios (150 people +) as a designer and I'd say about 50% of the designers I worked alongside had no real art of programming skills. Scripting is NOT programming; understanding how to script events and prototype features using Kismit or Flow Graph is NOT programming; neither is taking functions given to you by programmers and doing basic logic with them. 

 

I can design, build and script logic into levels - but I can't program. I can also build blockout levels in Max, SketchUp, Solids or Brushes and create wireframes in Photoshop or any other 2D software package... but I'm definitely NOT an artist.

 

Just some perspective....

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Scripting is NOT programming; understanding how to script events and prototype features using Kismit or Flow Graph is NOT programming; neither is taking functions given to you by programmers and doing basic logic with them.

 

This is programming.  Kismet and Flowgraph are graphical programming languages.  Just because your job title is not programmer and you may not know C++ does not mean that you are not programming a machine to do something.

 

I can design, build and script logic into levels - but I can't program.

 

Yes you can.  You just don't know the syntax of any main stream programming languages.

 

 

I can design, build and script logic into levels - but I can't program. I can also build blockout levels in Max, SketchUp, Solids or Brushes and create wireframes in Photoshop or any other 2D software package... but I'm definitely NOT an artist.

 

No not an artist but, you definatly have some artistic skills to be able to block out a convincing level.

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Kyle Rowley, on 05 Jun 2013 - 16:03, said:
Scripting is NOT programming; understanding how to script events and prototype features using Kismit or Flow Graph is NOT programming; neither is taking functions given to you by programmers and doing basic logic with them.

This is programming. Kismet and Flowgraph are graphical programming languages. Just because your job title is not programmer and you may not know C++ does not mean that you are not programming a machine to do something.
Kyle

Rowley, on 05 Jun 2013 - 16:03, said:
I can design, build and script logic into levels - but I can't program.


Yes you can. You just don't know the syntax of any main stream programming languages.

 

This is one of those points of discussion that always makes an argument.  A scripter calls himself a programmer, and a programmer says 'scripting ain't programming.' A scripter denies being a programmer, and somebody like Buster says 'what you do is programming.'

It's just semantics.

I have done lots of programming-like things (including programming), but I am definitely not a programmer.

Think of scripting or data tables as "programming lite."

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Id be very interested to know what the authors role is in the Games Industry just as a direct example of the article. Its not that I dont agree with it so much I think the information is not really accurate. There are two main things and both have been mentioned.

1) The distribution of the jobs. While you show only 1 job out of 10/12 needing programming but the percentage of workers that actually is, is much larger than 1/12 people.

2) Sure you can work in finance or legal or even as someone said a janitor. But while you work in the games industry youre not having an affect on the games. It would be like saying you wanted to be a professional soccer player but you are not good enough so instead you decide to do laundry for the team. Sure you are part of it but are you doing what you want or having an impact?

 

My last issue really is the fact that art is being classed as drawing. Instead I think it should be classed as having a skill and seeing programming, drawing, music etc... all the same. The argument could easily be turned to say I cant program or play music what can I do? A: Do art. But what if you cant do art either.

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