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royibernthal

3D Games Programming

4 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I have roughly 6 years of experience in programming 2D games, in Adobe Flash ActionScript 3.0 (OOP).

My goal has always been to take it to the next level and migrate to the 3D games industry.

 

In Flash, I always took charge of all of the programming aspects (engine, gameplay, etc..), and I realize that to work on 3D games I must specialize in one aspect.

 

I'm still unsure of what aspect I should pick, although gameplay seems very appealing.

 

I'd rather not be an engine programmer (translating math and physics into code), I realize it can be interesting but I'm looking for a more creative and game-related aspect.

 

So far in flash I mostly enjoyed programming features like Quests, Characters, Skills, Inventory, etc... that are related to the specific game's engine rather than rendering capabilities. I find it hard to determine what aspect this kind of programming falls under.

 

Once I figure out what aspect I want to focus on, I need to figure out how.

I'm looking for a path that will open for me a flexible future in terms of finding jobs.

I'm a programmer not a scripter, therefore I thought it might be a good idea to start gaining experience in C++.

What will be the best choice then? Unreal? CryEngine? Something completely different?

For instance I'm very unsure about unreal because it has its own unique scripting language, which will only be good as long as I stick to their engine.

 

On the bottom line I'd like something that will allow me to get a good job (once I get proper experience ofcourse) in big game companies such as UbiSoft, Blizzard and CDProjektRed.

Edited by royibernthal
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I mostly enjoyed programming features like Quests, Characters, Skills, Inventory, etc...

Yup, that'd be gameplay programming. I'd highly recommend checking out the job specifications for gameplay programmers in the companies you'd be interested in working at. For example, here's a link to a gameplay programmer position at Ubisoft: https://sjobs.brassring.com/1033/ASP/TG/cim_jobdetail.asp?SID=^xYuE9YwT_slp_rhc_lgCgzPl8VE6Q3UqJqdr7SFbGntXMOCxW64U0_slp_rhc_GojwjgyZ9JmUPwT_slp_rhc_zM&jobId=836068&type=search&JobReqLang=1&recordstart=1&JobSiteId=5290&JobSiteInfo=836068_5290&GQId=1324

 

Notice that you will have to be familiar with scripting languages for that position. As a gameplay programmer, whether or not you'll be using a scripting language will be up to the company and can go either way, so I wouldn't limit myself by saying "I'm not a scripter".

 

As for which engine you should start with, I don't think any of us can say that for you, as there's really no "best" choice, it's all subjective. However, it is true that for UDK, you'd be using Unrealscript, which is not applicable outside of the unreal engine and is being replaced with C++ for the approaching Unreal Engine 4, so I'll let that speak for itself. In CryEngine you'd be using C++ and/or lua, while you be using either C#, Boo (Python), or Javascript in Unity (C++ would only be if you're using Unity Pro IIRC).

 

If you're up to it, I'd say one of the best things to get a job would be to, well... make a game. Much easier said than done, but not only is it great for experience, but you'll have explored multiple different programming aspects (mainly gamplay, AI, and UI if you're working on an existing engine) and will be able to better decide what kinds of positions you'd most want to apply for.

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All gameplay programming positions require deep knowledge in C++, that's what I had hoped for.

I understand, I won't limit myself then.

 

In that case if I wanted to focus on Unreal I'd have wait for 4, it's good to hear unreal script is being replaced with C++, it certainly opens that door.

 

I do want to make a game based on an existing engine, it'll allow me to gain proper knowledge and experience that are otherwise very hard to gain through tutorials alone.

 

Would you recommend making a game in one of those engines (Unreal 4 or CryEngine 3) solely for practice? Keeping in mind that I most likely won't be able to get a license on my first run.

Would it be possible to publish a game with no commercial purposes (completely free) without a license?

Edited by royibernthal
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Would it be possible to publish a game with no commercial purposes (completely free) without a license?

 

That question would best be asked in the Business forum.

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Okay. I'll ask that specific question in the Business forum later, though it's the least of my concerns.

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