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Sugavanas

How to write console and pc games ?

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Hello guys, i am currently using Directx11 for writing games, i came to know that DirectX11 can write games for pc and xboxbut how can I write game for PS3 ? with just using the same source code for pc and xbox with just changing the controls, how was God Of War made ??huh.png  i am in love with developing console games and pc games wub.png

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Why do you expect that the answer this time will be any different from your last thread about game development on the PS3?

In last thread i asked more about publishing it, now i am asking can i do it in the same source code.

 

 

You don't, even Xbox has special code paths for certain things, even when you make a game for windows (live) the code path for it is not completely the same as the 360 version.

 

For now you should just focus on PC development, and keep making awesome small projects for it. When it comes time to apply for a job you can use those for your demos, after you finally get a job developing for consoles that is when you learn how to use them and what is different.

ok

 

 

 

You cannot write games for Playstation unless you work for a professional studio that has access to the Playstation SDK.

 

You cannot write God of War.  God of War was created by a team of hundreds of professionals and took years to create.  God of War III is a game that cost over $40,000,000.00 to develop.  

 

I don't intend to deflate your raft here but it's likely that you don't even have the fundamental skills required to complete a game at your age.  Stay in school and focus on mathematics and science based courses in high school; stride for good grades so that you can get into a good university study computer science or a related computer and information technology field.

Ya i accept that, God Of war is hard to make and hard to do it alone in my age. I should have been more specific, how did they write the coding for it

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I should have been more specific, how did they write the coding for it

 

How did they write the code for it?  They had a team of programmers who spent years building the engine, designing, and scripting.... If you want to be more specific you need to ask a specific question.  "how did they write the coding for it" is not really a question anyone can answer for you.  If you are wondering what language(s) they used... it's really not a good question to ask; you can program games in many languages.

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You write cross platform games in the same way as any other cross platform software, by keeping the platform specific bits as separated from the rest of the code as possible so that you can rewrite them easily for each supported platform.

This.

 

Core game mechanisms usually work independently of the platform, although you have to be careful :

 

HashMap<int, List<string>>

 

will result in a compile error on the PS3 (at least with the compiler I've used)... it tends to think that the >> is a bitwise shift.

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Because you do it like this...

 

HashMap<int, List<string> > 

 

Note the space after list, least I think that's right, I remember hitting something similar like this before.

 

On topic however, its not as well simple as how do you build console games and PC with the same code. IF you can even get the development environment for those consoles for a start, you'd likely have to create a layer of abstraction over the common functionality needed to create the systems you need on those specific environments. Not a one man job, alas. Not unless you got a lot of time on your hands.

Edited by thedevsykes
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Because you do it like this...
 
Note the space after list, least I think that's right, I remember hitting something similar like this before.

,>

Ah yeah, I should have mentioned the solution :)

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You write cross platform games in the same way as any other cross platform software, by keeping the platform specific bits as separated from the rest of the code as possible so that you can rewrite them easily for each supported platform.

This.
 
Core game mechanisms usually work independently of the platform, although you have to be careful :
 
HashMap<int, List<string>>
 
will result in a compile error on the PS3 (at least with the compiler I've used)... it tends to think that the >> is a bitwise shift.


Actually any compiler that doesn't support C++11 won't compile that code as the C++03 standard says that ">>" should be seen as the right shift operator, or an overloaded operator. So that's nothing wrong with the PS3 compiler there as they have said that they will never support C++11 for PS3.
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Actually any compiler that doesn't support C++11 won't compile that code as the C++03 standard says that ">>" should be seen as the right shift operator, or an overloaded operator. So that's nothing wrong with the PS3 compiler there as they have said that they will never support C++11 for PS3.

That's weird. I haven't used C++ in years, long before C++11 was supported in compilers, but I never had trouble embedding templates inside templates without that extra space. Compiled code both with Microsoft's compilers and gcc back then. 

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Since you seem to be set on console development, why don't you check out Ouya?

No licenses, SDK is free, runs on android.

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Actually any compiler that doesn't support C++11 won't compile that code as the C++03 standard says that ">>" should be seen as the right shift operator, or an overloaded operator. So that's nothing wrong with the PS3 compiler there as they have said that they will never support C++11 for PS3.

That's weird. I haven't used C++ in years, long before C++11 was supported in compilers, but I never had trouble embedding templates inside templates without that extra space. Compiled code both with Microsoft's compilers and gcc back then.

MS intentionally violated that standard for this reason.

 

In gcc as well, though?

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