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Fla5hbang

Pygame vs blender

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How different is blender to pygame programming wise?
I can make make basic games in pygame (top downs with key and mouse movement, collision, health...) but I'm more of a visual person (which is one reason i made games with gamemaker for a while) so insted of typing that a block is at acertain coordinate I'd rather add it where I want and then code in my desired info.

But how different is blender coding wise. Will it be more to type? Or will everything be simpler? Right now I just plan on making top down shooter kind of games. Should I stick with pygame or move on to blender?
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Stay with Pygame.  Why change unless you discover a major reason?

 

Yes, of course the programming is going to be at least somewhat different.  Since you need to better learn Python programming, it really makes no difference which engine you use - just do it.  You are too early in your development experience to be worried about this engine versus that engine.  Settle into one, start enjoying your little steps of progress, then you will be fine.

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Blender uses a logic editor, then you can add a sensor(e.g. Touch) and a controller(e.g. And) and finally Actuator(e.g. Visibility).

Now when the object is Touched it turns invisible,yet once you have learned phython you will almost compleatly abandon this system.

because I am a 3d artist I like using blender,this way I can make and edit my models with out having to export, on the down side it has no LOD manager for meshes.

You should at least attempt it once and decide for your self, it is free to download after all.

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Oh I forgot that iv been using python for a while now it just seems that you have to program way to much into pygame. Iv downloaded blender and so far I like what I see.
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Stay with Pygame.  Why change unless you discover a major reason?

 

Yes, of course the programming is going to be at least somewhat different.  Since you need to better learn Python programming, it really makes no difference which engine you use - just do it.  You are too early in your development experience to be worried about this engine versus that engine.  Settle into one, start enjoying your little steps of progress, then you will be fine.

good point. im gonna stick with pygame but im gonna play around with modeling in blender in my spare time for fun. 

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Yeah, that is okay because you are going to need the modeling experience if you want to be an all in one person developer.

I highly recommend that you make 3 to 5 simple 2D games for your first stage of learning.

As examples:

Crossword Puzzle (Can actually get as complex as you want it to be)

Tic Tac Toe (Don't laugh! You can use characters instead of Xs and Os, effects, sounds, etc, etc...make the line be a laser beam! Be creative!)

Tetris
Pokémon
Pac Man
Donkey Kong
Defender
Asteroids
Mario Brothers
Galaxy

... and many more examples of copycat projects. You must not violate any copyright by publishing them, but nobody can stop you from experimenting on your own with similar concepts. One advantage to tackle some of these is that many people in the game development community have done stuff like that and can better help you than if you went your own way.

Get used to making sprites, animated effects, lighting effects, and so forth in Blender. Find a way to get your creation from Blender to Pygame, perhaps by Collada or whatever is common with Pygame developers. Collada experience would give you a lot of advantages in the future, by the way. A simple wide base is a good foundation for future programming, so don't get too complicated in your coding for quite a while. One more thing, start making nice, basic interfaces in the early efforts and keep at this your whole career in GDev.
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I highly recommend that you make 3 to 5 simple 2D games for your first stage of learning.

As examples:

Crossword Puzzle (Can actually get as complex as you want it to be)

Tic Tac Toe (Don't laugh! You can use characters instead of Xs and Os, effects, sounds, etc, etc...make the line be a laser beam! Be creative!)

Tetris
Pokémon
Pac Man
Donkey Kong
Defender
Asteroids
Mario Brothers
Galaxy

 

so far iv made tic tac toe, asteroids, and a top down shooter. im woking on donkey kong right now, next i plan on making duck hunt but with various animals. iv never thought about doing pokemon though thats a really good idea. thanks for all of the advice

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