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Dennisvb

Staying motivated.

14 posts in this topic

I really want to be good at game programming, but I keep getting distracted. Any tips?
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Set a small goal, or have one set it for you. How much programming experience do you have?

 

Have you played any text-based games before (I count Pokemon).

 

EDIT: And by small goal, I mean something to design within an afternoon or something.

Edited by Vincent_M
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When I get distracted, I take a break from programming for a month or two. Then I get back to programming, and I am motivated again. It's like playing a good video game: after so many playthroughs, I will get bored of it. If I stop playing that game for a while, then play it again after few monthes or few years, it is fun again.

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i have this same problem. now when i want to make a game but dont fell like programming of feel overwhelmed ill play around with gamemaker for a second kinda like sketching out my game idea. also iv set up a goal to do the upcoming ludam dare jam. im a beginner in game dev though so my goal is  learn the basics and attempt to take what iv learned and make a very(very)simple game. 

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Game jams are good and from what I've found out, it's not a hard requirement to make a very good game for one. It's more about the journey than the end goal. The point of those is to have fun, and as a bonus you might get a prototype of something interesting that you want to build more on later.

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   When you start a new game, the first thing you usually do is thinking a lot about whole game's organization, write a lot of code, but it doesn't give any visible results. You can't play your game yet, all you have is just lines of code. And this is what usually demotivates me.

   I like to think about my projects for several days WITHOUT any coding, keeping an idea in my mind while doing some regular stuff. And then, after a few days, when I'm in a right mood, do "excessive programming" for a couple of hours (or more).

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Thanks everybody! All your comments will help me for sure! I have no time to respond to all of you now, because I have no time at the moment. Just wanted to let you know I read all your comments!
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When I have a lot of energy and passion because of learning, programming and creating my own projects - I can spend many many hours each day. Unfortunately we are only humans, and the day, when our body would say "I need a break" and "I don't want to do it, please, do something else" would come. It is signal which we can't ignore - it says, that something is terribly wrong.

 

I believe that our motivation is resultant of our healthy lifestyle, clear vision of our targets, making small ( remember SMALL, but well-judged ) steps every day. There is one more in our passion - the most difficult to accomplish: look out for overwhelming problems. However there is a lot of unpleasure stuff we have to learn/make. I believe that key to success is good plan for those steps - split it to small problems, and for each give You some time and space.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Geek Message Blog

The steps I take to make a dream come true:

 

http://geekmessage.wordpress.com

Edited by Cthuga
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Carry a notebook with you. No seriously. All the time, everywhere. Make sure at most it's a run to your car to get your notebook. Life is demanding, and you can't always be at a computer. Its not healthy to always be at a computer. But make sure you have a way of writing down ideas you have as soon as they come to you. I have a notebook filled up with personal monologues about the theories behind my game's design, why I chose certain features, the backbones, the structures, the thing my artist needs to do his job. Writing it down will not only help you remember, but it will also give you a better method of processing your ideas instead of just thinking of it once, and trying to program later.

 

That's a good tip. I started carrying a pocket-sized sketchbook with me a few months back, initially with the intent of practicing drawing to avoid losing the skills I picked up in architecture school. I ended up mostly just writing in it as you described (there's an illustration page here and there, too). It increased my productivity greatly; I remember my ideas more easily if I write them down, and if I don't remember, I can just read them again. I tend to adhere to goals I set for myself better if I write them down, too.

 

Anyway, thanks for posting this topic, as I'm currently experiencing a total loss of motivation myself and finding these answers useful. Got my XNA-based 2D tile platformer's collision detection working, it's loading and displaying levels correctly, and now I guess I'm bored with it; no desire to work on it at all. I think I'll take a break from this project and read Frank Luna's 3D Game Programming with DirectX11 and Ian Millington's Game Physics Engine Development, which have been sitting on my desk for weeks, taunting me with their fancy math and much-coveted third dimension. There's also the matter of coming up with assets for the 2D game. By the time I'm done with all that, hopefully my interest will have... recharged.

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I think I'll take a break from this project and read Frank Luna's 3D Game Programming with DirectX11 and Ian Millington's Game Physics Engine Development, which have been sitting on my desk for weeks, taunting me with their fancy math and much-coveted third dimension.

 

Actually on my journey getting to this point, me and my artist were contemplating using the Unreal Engine... actually that was the last one we tried before, after getting fed up with their scripting system, we were just like "Fuck it. I'll make my own 2d engine. With Blackjack and hookers." I was actually surprised when I was planning things for my 2d game I had actually learned a whole lot from a 3d engine, not just 3d concepts but general game design concepts, that have now influenced a lot of the current designs of my project. Not to mention, it kind of helped me imagine what the "pseudo-third dimension" would look like in 3d space if the character could traverse objects drawn at different levels of the screen.

 

Good luck man, hope you get your motivation back soon.

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