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Existing 3D Game Engine for Gameplay Programming

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Obviously I won't be able to start my career at those big companies. But I want my path to always lead to that and not forget my goal.

 

I'm already a self employed Adobe Flash ActionScript 3.0 games developer working with an ex-Ubisoft artist.

If the companies I wish to work at ask for C++, why not make kick ass stuff in a C++ environment instead of separating C++ and kickass stuff into two different tasks?

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Royibernthal, 

 

"However, UnrealScript is being removed."

 

I guess that isn't so much of a shock. 

 

"Unreal Kismet is being evolved to a far more powerful system. Epic claims that you will be able to create a mod entirely using the updated visual scripting system. The next generation of Kismet now allows for scripting of object behaviors, as well as the previous functionality for levels. It includes a system for visual debugging, as well as a template system referred to as blueprint, for placing of objects with pre-defined behaviors in the world.

For those wishing to customize further, programmers can click on a property and edit the C++ code directly, with no rebuild time required."

 

Start with the C++ coding and learn about Kismet. Good luck!

 

Hope your question is answered.

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Most game companies have their own engine, only newer studios (created 2 years ago max) use ready-to-use engines, and most of them will go for unity because of license fees. cryengine is a risk because too expensive, only unreal would be a good idea to learn because the pricing is progressive according to sales. also its the best engine... of all time. just that. (the v4 that is.) and it will teach you the best technologies and practice, in terms of tooling integration etc... probably the best example anyway for a company with its own engine to aim at.

However, its not a question of resume.

Seriously, if I were to see the resume of a guy who brags with a list of "know engines" or "engines worked with" I would find that so lame that I would put the paper aside and see the next candidate.

If you want to say that you have experience with an engine, say it naturally in your cover letter.

But what is important rather, is having a general 3D knowledge. read the research papers ! when you know who is Kajiya, Nishita, Blinn, Kaplanyan, Rammamorthi, Torrance, Daschbacher, Hanranhan, Jensen, Schlick, Debevec, Perlin, Nayar, Lefebvre, Crassin, Neyret... and what is their work and all of their ramifications, then and only then you have conquered the knowledge that is necessary to continue this industry.

I insist that it is crucial to read on all of that, and nvidia research, ati research and stuffs like GPU gems and cie. not knowing an engine that will give you practice on the technology at a frame T in its history.

Also, games are not only a matter of graphics, but also specific game mechanics and tooling and various other production pipeline related stuff, and embracing the whole "corporate engine" is a plus because you can work more efficiently, in a huge codebase, thinking about human factors, e.g. not enforcing your own coding rules on everybody is an exemple of how to ease team work. Using diplomacy and politics to help the company move forward, when you want to make your project move from svn to git you're going to need those, I tell you...

I don't know how many hours I could continue on with that, but to sum it up all, I wanted to give you another perspective because you seem so hot headed and a bit stubborn on technology matters. C++ is great but my personal opinion is that game companies have already passed a turning point where C++ is becoming too expensive and a lot of studios died last year (more than 50) because of lack of clients of promising projects says the press. I believe its rather a problem of being too expensive because of C++. And especially the way it is used for game dev. it is enough to read the paper about EASTL to have a glimpse ! they code everything themselves for god knows what obscure reason. Many are predicting the death of AAA games against casual games. The CEO of crytek said himself that the upcoming generation of consoles is probably the last.

They are all responsible and they can only blame themselves, its not all because of C++, C++ is an awsome language, but the way game companies use it has a big role in this global decline.

I hope I gave you some perspective.

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If I were the OP and I didn't want to use low level directx or openGL, then I would use either Irrlicht, or Ogre3d to do my drawing/window manager, and input ( ogre3d comes with an input lib, irrlicht handles this too ).

 

Irrlicht is easier to use and get started, Ogre3D is more tweakable.

 

However I would rather use low level openGL and libs like GLFW, GLEW, and GLM.

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If you're still checking out new engines I suggest Platinum Arts Sandbox. it's open source and written in c++, so once you're a c++ wizard you can rewrite the code, change physics and make it into the best game engine in the world (for your needs). the scripting langue is a full fledged programming language called Cubescript. It's not the best language for beginners due to the lack of documentation but if youre into c++ i bet you can pick it up just fine. Looking at the c++ source code gives you a great idea of the programming that goes into a 3d engine. The licence is very generous as well. I hope this helped. 

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Learning a new framework for programming like C#(Unity) and Unrealscript(UE3) is definitely not a good way to start. UE3 and UE4 does allow you to code c++ directly for your needs but it requires you to purchase the full license which is very pricey for us indie developers. If you really want to stick to c++ coding, i advise you use Cryengine. CryEngine and UE3 is definitely the best choice among the other engines said here. But if you want to try UE3, you would find it easy to learn most especially Unrealscript is based on common C++ syntax. However, you could write your own engine, but it requires you alot of effort and time to finish it. It'll take you years to even finalize a beta version of your engine that is stable enough to create a simple game. I chose UE3 because it's really easy to learn. If you are a C++ programmer, you can just start on class structures in UnrealScript and go start programmming.

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