• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Helenius

Buying a "developer" spot on the new Richard Garriot project

31 posts in this topic

My personal opinion: Regardless of the where the truth lies, Richard Garriot might be a great game designer but his media relation skills aren't that great.

 

Heheheh... absolutely. Even if you look at it through the "Crappy Internet Sensationalist Reporting" filter as Jonathan Blow dubbed it (which likely is to some extent true) he still comes over as a serious dick with this statement.

 

He is probably even telling the truth (though this is not something particular to game designers). Sturgeon's Law has it that "ninety percent of everything is crap", and Sturgeon's Law is so universally true, everywhere. I've rarely seen something where it doesn't apply, if ever.

 

So 90% of all designers are crap -- OK, but this applies to 90% of all musicians, painters, or physicians, too. 90% of all restaurants are ... maybe not absolute crap, but at least not places I'd want to go, either.

 

Truth has it that there's a lot of people living on this planet, and everybody has his own dreams, goals, and self-image, and everybody finally makes a career choice. But not everyone is necessarily talented in what he chooses to do. That's life.

 

However, telling such a thing (even if it is maybe the truth) just doesn't show great media relation or social interaction skills, especially in a situation like this.

 

Figuratively, and even giving him a strong benefit of doubt for out-of-context quotes, he said  "Guys, give me a million dollars to make this game, You're going to be involved in designing it, your opinions are very valuable. You're awesome." and then follows up with "Thank for the money you losers, you all suck, I'm the best".

 

Even if the quotes have been somewhat torn out of context over at Gamasutra, they still basically say this, or at least can be very easily understood in such a way. Which truly isn't a great example of PR skill :-)

Edited by samoth
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sturgeon's Law has it that "ninety percent of everything is crap", and Sturgeon's Law is so universally true, everywhere. I've rarely seen something where it doesn't apply, if ever.

Yes, but the problem is that how you define 'crap' (or in other words, what people like and don't like) varies so greatly from person to person that you'll never find two people for whom the 10% of something (no matter what the subject is, be it games, music, films etc) are in complete agreement.

Basically the law only works on individual level and is otherwise not applicable to large masses.

Of course by that law, 90% of my argument was crap...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

As an update to the kickstarter success and the guarantees for those people to take part in the design process, I think the following article might be of interest
 
 
I think most game designers really just suck - Richard Garriot
 
What's interesting to this, is the two updates made to this post by Richard Garriot, which could on one hand - legitimately be said to try and clarify his own words and meaning more clearly than as taken by PC Gamer and Gamasutra.....or on the other hand -  just as legitimately argued by critics that his updates are belated attempts at damage control after having based a large part of his Kickstarter on the guarantee of access to Pledger's being provided deeper involvement in the game design process.
 
My personal opinion: Regardless of the where the truth lies, Richard Garriot might be a great game designer but his media relation skills aren't that great.

 

Thanks.  His second update in particular was a really interesting read.

 

I am sympathetic to Garriott's viewpoint on this.  His main points are there isn't as much innovation in game design as there should be, and it is harder to find excellent game designers than it is excellent artists or programmers once you get to the highest levels (major titles).    

 

I think the reason for that is perhaps much more complex than just some of the possibilities he gives though.  While I somewhat agree that having programming and artist skills could make a game designer more effective, I think the biggest reason is simply the fear of risk-taking.  Coming up with something original could mean a huge hit, but also it could mean a huge flop.  Most AAA game designers/producers are going to play it safe-- if they just clone some other game, and add a couple small tweaks, the worse the game will do is around breakeven and so they keep their jobs no matter what and move on to the next game.  Thus incremental game design changes are culturally favored.

 

That is just my theory-- I do not have experience working in a major game studio so I'd be curious if anyone here is a major studio game designer/producer (with an anonymous account of course smile.png) who wants to chime in.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard Garriot might be a great game designer but his media relation skills aren't that great.

 

Quite the opposite. He has a Kickstarter running and wants maximum publicity. What's the best way to manage that? Get yourself featured across every gaming site in the world with a controversial statement. If you're lucky you get a follow up a few days later where you get to row back a bit and clarify what you meant.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite the opposite. He has a Kickstarter running and wants maximum publicity. What's the best way to manage that? Get yourself featured across every gaming site in the world with a controversial statement.

 

Backers may increase, decrease, or cancel their pledge at any time during the fundraising campaign, except that they may not cancel or reduce their pledge if the campaign is in its final 24 hours and the cancellation or reduction would drop the campaign below its goal.

 

12 days left on the kickstarter.

 

If I had chosen to a do a pledge on the basis of the game design access (inline with the OP's thoughts)...his commentary would have helped me to decide this was not a place where my opinions were valued. Of course we had pretty much decided that in the thread anyway smile.png

Edited by Stormynature
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely almost everybody paying to get "designer access" already believes one of two things:

  1. They have no useful skills to offer except a few ideas, so it's not like they're being insulted. This is just a cool opportunity for them, like a paid internship.
  2. They have some awesome ideas that the industry has ignored, because the old designers have no idea what they're doing.

Either way, I don't see much conflict between what Garriott said and the motivation of the people taking up that particular pledge level.

 

And on the whole, that specific pledge level is just one among many. It's more important for him to drive traffic, even if a few people drop off that particular pledge level. Given that uptake for both the level before it and the level above it are higher, it suggests people are generally not all that bothered about this specific offering (and sensibly so).

Edited by Kylotan
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly I don't disagree with you that all of this will increase traffic to the kickstarter, I just don't see it as being a masterpiece of deliberate marketing by him but rather a positive byproduct of some poorly thought out statements.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thing is, there is a subtle difference between believing or knowing something, and saying it in public.

 

When have a date, and you tell your girl "You know, I normally don't date fat chicks", you will get a rather predictable reaction. It does not matter at all whether she's maybe really obese (or whether you only have a perverted sense of humor). The perceived message is the same, and the reaction will be the same. And no, you won't be able to explain that you meant something different, no matter how hard you try :-)

 

Any such thing remotely close to "Everybody sucks, except me and 3 other people on the planet" conveys a similar message, no matter how much you follow up explaining that you meant to say something completely different and that you were unfairly quoted out of context.

 

You just can't say such a thing without getting a negative reaction, even if it is the truth (or if you think it's the truth).

 

I don't believe in crowd funding, so I didn't/wouldn't pledge anyway (plus, I didn't buy the whole "buy being a developer" thing), but sure enough if I had put my money into that, I would revoke it because of that statement, as it is mutually exclusive with the "we value your input" claim, which makes the entire project come over as somewhat hypocritical (in my opinion, yours may of course differ).

 

But yes, you're right that it will likely only increase traffic ("the only bad publicity is no publicity").

 

And even assuming a considerable number of people drops off now, it wouldn't make a real difference. It is not impossible (and not really illegal) to pledge for your own project. So if you have a 1M goal and you drop short at 800k two hours before close date, the math is easy: put in another 200k to get 1M (minus the 5% provision) out. Net gain 750k.

Edited by samoth
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But that is somewhat mischaracterising what he said. He never said he doesn't value input, but that people in the industry who call themselves designers are generally not very good, in his opinion. That's a much more specific claim, and one that doesn't apply to anybody who will be pledging at that level.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0