• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
_unreal

C++ Programming - What IDE to use ?

28 posts in this topic

Just starting with my 3D game engine and i'm wandering what would the best IDE to use:

 

I have at the moment the following;

- Visual studio 2012 (with added plugins)

- Code-blocks

 

I'm just wandering is there something i'm missing that could be better, i personally prefer Visual studio at the moment.

 

So what i wan't to know any other possible IDE's i could use

 

Thanks in advance

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If there was such a thing as the "best" IDE then there would only be one on the market (and everyone would be using it). Clearly this isn't the case and each have their own pros and cons. VS is a mighty fine IDE but of course it's Windows only so if you were working on multiple platforms then it might be more convenient to use a cross-platform IDE (of which there are a few). However, you state that you personally prefer VS so unless you have other requirements not stated in your OP then I see no pressing reason to switch to another.

Edited by GeneralQuery
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe Eclipse or Netbeans? It's more for Java but also C/C++-support. Now i'm using Eclipse atm

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From your recent posts I see that you plan on working with Direct X so I guess you only target windows. If I'm right, I suggest you to continue with Visual Studio. I personally think its the best C++ IDE for windows, mainly because of its fast and reliable debugger (especially if you ever need to do remote debugging, using gdb for remote debugging is a pain in the ass...).

 

If you plan on going cross-platform, Qt Creator + CMake is a nice setup. The IDE is cross-platform, modern and provides a lots of tools (refactoring, code completion, gui designer with Qt -> nice for the engine's tools) while CMake give you a lots of flexibility and gives you a way to easily  package your software across all platforms.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I swear by Codeblocks because it's cross platform and it's pretty quick. Also, I find it easy to customize, but IDE is all about preference I guess. :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CodeBlocks for Linux development.

VisualStudio2010 or CodeBlocks for Windows development.

If you're creating both Linux and Windows applications, CodeBlocks alone is fine.

Eclipse is very slow and extremely annoying in certain ways.

Edited by maxgpgpu
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- Visual studio 2012 (with added plugins)

If I recall correctly, VS Express doesn't have plugins, so you have the Professional edition... right?

VS is clunky out of the box, but with plugins it can become pretty nice. (Even if it still kind of sucks at editing text.) If you don't have Visual Assist X already, get it. It's not too expensive for what it does.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some things I'm missing from Visual Studio that for example QtCreator has natively:
- Smart indention (copy/paste a piece of code into a scope with different indention and it automatically adds or remove tabs for you, rather then manually select all lines and press tab several times).
- Pointer recognition (press . after a variable that is a pointer and it is replaced with -> automatically).
- Automatic closing quotes/brackets for literals/function calls/scopes/includes.
- Hotswap between cpp/header (VS only has this for cpp>header using context menu).
- Hotswap between declaration/implementation (VS only has separate go to definition/declaration that is still slow and buggy with large projects).
- Syntax highlighting is still limited in VS without plugins, although it's catching up with 2012.

Basically, when it comes to writing code, I find using plain old Visual Studio without third party plugins bad for your productivity.

None of those things would be particularly hard to implement (on top of the intellisense engine they already have, anyway). I think the only reason Microsoft hasn't added them is because they would put Visual Assist X (which includes all of your bullet points) out of business. Edited by Nypyren
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could check out ENIGMA at http://www.enigma-dev.org it's a free and open source clone of Game Maker but that actually compiles so you can use reall C++ pointers and other things and we already run about 80% of Game Maker games out of the box 3x as fast.

 

Wxenigmawelcome.png

-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try QtCreator also. From what I've heard it has amazing syntax highlighting and can be very useful.

 

I use Visual Studio for C++, and Eclipse for Java. CodeBlocks is very good also, however when I used it (was my first IDE), the syntax highlighting would get in the way a lot.

 

Cheers :)!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man up. angry.png

 

Use notepad.

 

 

 

Nah, VS is best for windows dev. Once you get it to install correctly you can just install the DX SDK and the two should link up automagically.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Im inclined to disagree I think OpenGL is much easier to understand for newcomers, and you can't make anything cross platform with DX so good luck getting it on any iStore or anything.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im inclined to disagree I think OpenGL is much easier to understand for newcomers, and you can't make anything cross platform with DX so good luck getting it on any iStore or anything.

 

OpenGL is not an IDE.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Im not really sure, I'd have to say codeblocks even still, because you can use a cross platform wxWidgets toolkit for GUI stuff which does allot more than .NET framework controls. It can do MDI and allow docking floating panels, it also has a Scintilla wrapper, which is like a code editor with the line numbers and stuff and it can be customized and parses pretty much all of the known languages, being XML HTML C# C++ Java Basic you name it. But if you really just want an easy to use game programming IDE and language for only Windows development, use XNA & Visual C#.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im not really sure, I'd have to say codeblocks even still, because you can use a cross platform wxWidgets toolkit for GUI stuff which does allot more than .NET framework controls. It can do MDI and allow docking floating panels, it also has a Scintilla wrapper, which is like a code editor with the line numbers and stuff and it can be customized and parses pretty much all of the known languages, being XML HTML C# C++ Java Basic you name it. But if you really just want an easy to use game programming IDE and language for only Windows development, use XNA & Visual C#.

 

I think you're confusing a lot of different concepts into this discussion. There is a question about what IDE to use on the table but most of your responses have been why cross platform solutions are better than Windows solutions (which may be perfectly valid, but just seems a bit off topic). OpenGL was something you mentioned, that can be used with any IDE. wxWidgets is a valid toolkit suggestion for GUI stuff, but again, that can be used from any IDE.

 

Visual Studio doesn't limit you to the .Net framework and CodeBlocks isn't the only avenue to wxWidgets.

 

I think the OP has gotten the best available suggestions available on IDEs so I have nothing new to add on that front.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you not read my last sentence? That is why I suggested XNA and Visual C# if he really want's something basic to start out with. But if he really wants to learn 3D programming the real technical way (DirectX/OpenGL) I would suggest he learn OGL it is much better I think to learn with than DirectX, plus it saves him from wasting his time learning DirectX. I would start with OGL and then learn DirectX, allot of DX code is pretty archaic and it is nowhere as safe as OGL programming.

Personally I would suggest he use something like Unity3D or Game Maker, or more specifically the open source free Game Maker that I am a developer for.
-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As previously said, I also suggest Visual Studio, it is great on Windows OS, well it is the best I know...

 

If you ever go to other platforms ( for example Linux ), then I suggest to use QtCreator, it has a really good debugger and the usability is awesome, but it really feels a bit strange to use it for "normal" C++ code. But there is a good alternate too, like Code::Blockswink.png

 

However, if you consider making something big and multi-platform ,it is better to use cmake or other build tools instead the internal project management of Visual Studio or qmake( it's not bad, but not useful for non-qt development ).

Edited by Indloon
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0