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game of thought

Is it time to move on to c++?

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Hello, i finished reading learn python the hard way by Zed Shaw 2 months ago and have made a rather complex text based game using the standard library(modding, save/load, morale).

From then i have learned some more stuff such as some very basic PyOpenGL(for some reason it will randomly freeze, Intel video card with toshiba bespoke drivers? Doesn't exactly sound like a match made in heaven, does it?)and the speed as well as the indentation is a bit annoying.And as a result of seeing some of the speed benefit(30x from one post) and the huge variety of libraries and the fact it is compiled(i found it very annoying having to distribute the game without the source). So i was wondering if it is worth it?Or do you feel i am not qualified for it?


Thank you for your time.
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What do you mean by "move on"? You don't "move on" to another language, you just learn it. And do you think raw C++ will be any easier?

 

Also, I doubt you'll get a 30x speed increase anyway. Or even close to 4x. The entire graphics pipeline is language-agnostic and those parts of the game logic which require some CPU power are generally compiled to C by Python for efficiency (even more so if you use stuff like scipy for arrays). Obviously it's going to suck if you are using text-based dictionaries to store tile cells...

 

Sure, you can give C++ a shot - it will only take you a week or two to get comfortable with the basic C++ syntax and libraries, and then you can try and write stuff with it and see if you find it easier, more comfortable/productive or simply enjoyable to you.

 

And PS: you can always distribute your sources along with the compiled executable, if you so desire.

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Python is very slow and hogs memory.  Sure if you call a function that does lots of work like parsing a file, it turns it into c calls, but most of your code isn't like that.  It's meant to be a scripting language.

 

If you want to learn c++ then learn it, you should have a fairly easy time since you already can program in python, and you can even use python from within c++.

 

Grab yourself 2 books.  1 for a introduction/tutorial type book and the other should be a reference type book.  Also add to your browser favorites/bookmarks sites like

www.cppreference.com

www.cplusplus.com

www.msdn.com

 

Possible intro book

http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C-Through-Game-Programming/dp/1435457420/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363302867&sr=1-3&keywords=c%2B%2B+beginner

Possible c++11 reference book

http://www.amazon.com/Standard-Library-Tutorial-Reference-2nd/dp/0321623215/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363302837&sr=1-2&keywords=c%2B%2B+reference

Edited by EddieV223
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No need to bash python.... op ask your self. Do I want to learn c++¿ if the answer is yes. Than by all means do so else.... well I think you catch my drift. Do what you want to do.

Also don't blame your hardware before you got proof.... you more than likely have a bug in your code causing it to freeze. Take time to fix it and learn from it.... things don't get easier just by jumpi g to another language.
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