• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mr.runner

Xna animation without using skinned model example?

6 posts in this topic

The project I choose is a game where robots could fight. I have done all the job at importing models in my XNA game, but I am having difficulty playing a FBX animation. I could use skinned model example from microsoft website,but the problem is, my FBX file does not contain joints (skeleton). Arms, legs and head are controlled in the way of rotating at pivot centre (you can see how it looks in the bottom pictures).

PICTURES: http://postimage.org/image/7gnns9sz7/
http://postimage.org/image/t4cm2ptdf/

My question is:"How can I change skinned model example, so that would play FBX animation without my model containing skeleton?" or "Is this even possible?"

Edited by mr.runner
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rephrase the problem to how can I turn my pivot centre's into joints to form a skeleton. I assume you are making a game where the player has to carefully control each pivot of his robot to get it to perform actions like walking and fighting?

 

Anyway, your pivot centre's are just the same as a bone or joint in a skeleton. I think the only difference might be that you do not wish for vertex skinning to happen based on them?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My problem is not rotating objects, but playing animation. Maybe I don't understand or maybe I didn't explained the problem correctly.

Let's say that we have a box and that we would like to extrude every 6 faces. But we would like to extrude them from 0 seconds to 10 seconds (slowly extruding). This would be our *fbx animation.

 

And my question is:  "How can I play that animation, if the animation doesn't contain skeleton?"

 

 

 PS: Extruding box is just an example.  

Edited by mr.runner
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not the best person to explain this but 'm gonna try.

If for example you have animation that lasts 10 seconds you could set 10 animation keys/sequences as one for each second, then for each key you have each vertex at certain position and/or orientation. Then you move your animation track "cursor" over time and interpolate position/orientation of each vertex to make animation going.

 

                     cursor
             0--------|------1---------------2---------------3---------------4---------------5---------------6---------------....10
vertex1 xy(30,10)      xy(40,10)     xy(50,20) ....
vertex2 xy(10,10)      xy(20,10)     xy(30,20) ....
vertex3 xy(10,10)      xy(10,10)     xy(10,10) ....
...

 

// for each vertex
cursor.time += deltaTime * animSpeed;
cursor.time = fmod(cursor.time, 10s);
float lerpTime = (cursor.time - key[keyInx].time) / (key[keyInx +1].time - key[keyInx].time); // 0 - 1
CurrentVertexPos = lerp( key[keyInx].xy, key[keyInx+1].xy, lerpTime );
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok. I think I understand what you mean. But how could I change skinning model example from Microsoft for working the same way but with the difference that my model would not contain skeleton?

 

PS: I am new to XNA so please don't be angry if I missed the point. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Skeletons in a model are essentially a collection of special mesh deformations, which influence an object based on vertex weights you give the model during its creation. Since your model does not use a skeleton, it does not have vertex weights so it cannot be skinned in the way you would expect.

 

Robots (and other mechanical objects) need matrix transformations that are only local to specific parts of a mesh, and it's ideal to export your model into a group of meshes, one for each pivot sphere, limb, etc. Then you can apply movement to the parts individually.

 

Here's an example of a tank with animated parts in a more rigid fashion. Each part is a separate mesh and has a bone matrix transformation applied locally to move each part. You animate the bones not in the way a skinned model would, but with rigid transforms over a hierarchy of parts.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for answering so quickly.

So just to make sure, if I understand last reply. I cannot really play animation from *fbx without skeleton. But I can rotate parts of the 3D model, so it will look like playing animation (something like that is used in example you gave it). But if I do rotating (or scaling or moving) in code, wouldn't than be animating (in code) the "walk" pretty hard.

 

I mean you would have to rotate multiple parts, for having natural "walking" cycle. Walk cycle would be much easier to create in autodesk maya  than writting code.

Example what I mean with walk cycle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0XaK6UCg4A      

Edited by mr.runner
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0