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latch

The games that everybody writes.

29 posts in this topic

What are games you see written over and over again?

 

Here's my list to get you started:

Breakout/Arkanoid

Snake/Tron lightcycle

Tic Tac Toe

Pocket Tanks(power and angle shooter like angrybirds)

Edited by latch
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I do mobile apps and CTD is difficult there, but Force Closes are easy!

 

For years, I have seen common games and said to myself, "There's another one!" and I thought it would be interesting to find other coder's commonly encountered(or written) games.

 

That and I 'review' unknown apps on my blog and its app and I avoid commonly written apps for that site.

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@Haps: I enjoy that one so much, I've snuck that entire game as a hidden feature in all my projects. laugh.png

Man, i thought i was the only one=-)

 

Asteroid/space invaders i'd say is a beginner one as well.

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I don't know about games that are only written (you already covered the typical beginner projects).

For stuff that you can buy on steam and on retail (the publishers can confirm somebody wrote them), i'd say

 

- First Person Shooters (3D pointing and unprojected clicking based action games)

- Real Time Strategy games (Scrolling and build-order based action games)

- MMOs (You know, ripping players of their money while making them feel they're a part of a bigger community)

- Arcade tetrisish games (Title often random combination of [gem, jewel, gold, diamond] and [quest, mania, rush, panic, puzzler])

 

Otherwise;

- Browser-based business games. (Like MMOs, but by developers with lower budgets and more obvious marketing schemes.)

 

It's been years since I last saw a good tic-tac-toe on retail.

Edited by SuperVGA
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Breakout
Asteroids

Space Invaders
Hunt the Wumpus
Match 3

Boggle
Tetris

Snake
Scorched Earth / Worms clones

 

Sokoban

 

That isn't to say that non of these clones / beginner games arn't cool or have origional features there are some really good Match3 or Breakout games out there.

 

The one game that I think there is too many of is:
Generic RPGs (there really are millions of these, the overall mechanic is the same from epic 3d right down to text based)

 

Edited by Buster2000
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Surprised no one's mentioned 2-Stick shooter (Geometry Wars, I MAED A GAM3 W1TH Z0MBIES 1N IT!!!1, etc...)

 

They're pretty common these days, especially on XBLIG.

Edited by Jutaris
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Surprised no one's mentioned 2-Stick shooter (Geometry Wars, I MAED A GAM3 W1TH Z0MBIES 1N IT!!!1, etc...)

 

They're pretty common these days, especially on XBLIG.

 

Ya know, for arcadey type games, 2-Stick shooters are among my favorites.  I think I put more quarters into Smash TV than any other game in the local arcade back in the day.

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- MMOs (You know, ripping players of their money while making them feel they're a part of a bigger community)

Why the chip on your shoulder regarding MMOs?

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Pong, Pac-Man and blocks (because God forbid, we call it Tetris)!

 

@Haps: That one finds its way into almost every piece of software I write!

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- MMOs (You know, ripping players of their money while making them feel they're a part of a bigger community)

Why the chip on your shoulder regarding MMOs?

I was in a  cynical mood when I posted it. smile.png -Still think MMOs belong on the list, though.

Not as a common beginner project (well, maybe that too) but as a written project.

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Wow, although I haven't been a games programmer for some time now, looking through the list so far I've done about 90% of them, and the rest I've never heard of.
I also did a Sonic the Hedgehog clone "Tonic the Mouse", back in the day, so basically I'd throw the category of any "2D platformer" in there.
One other type of game I made early on was a maze game, the kind where you can only see a certain radius around you. So add "Maze game" to the list.

I'm surprised Tetris didn't make the list in the first post. That would be the first thing many people think of. I thought mine was so cool once I got self-playing mode working. Oh if only I had the time to start writing games again...
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Crash to Desktop is wildly popular amongst beginners and experts alike.

 

Chase The Bad Pointer is another one that everyone does.  Most of us end up rewriting that one many times over, in fact.

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I'm surprised Tetris didn't make the list in the first post.

Tetris didn't make the list in my first post because it didn't exist yet when I started coding.

Edited by latch
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Wow, although I haven't been a games programmer for some time now, looking through the list so far I've done about 90% of them, and the rest I've never heard of.
I also did a Sonic the Hedgehog clone "Tonic the Mouse", back in the day, so basically I'd throw the category of any "2D platformer" in there.
One other type of game I made early on was a maze game, the kind where you can only see a certain radius around you. So add "Maze game" to the list.
I'm surprised Tetris didn't make the list in the first post. That would be the first thing many people think of. I thought mine was so cool once I got self-playing mode working. Oh if only I had the time to start writing games again...

Tetris didn't make the list in my first post because it didn't exist yet when I started coding.

I'm curious to know what you mean by this! :D
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A scrolling shoot-em-up was one of the first games for me. Then a match 3 puzzle game.

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Just as a play topic, I would include more of a screen saver than game: Particle physics for the heck of it.  Giving them gravity, Chase, evade, follow, leash, bounce, screen wrap, explode/fireworks, color change, jitter, orbit, spin, create/delete logic, pour, scatter, stack, elastic, size, alpha, mimmic(images), etc...

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I'm surprised Tetris didn't make the list in the first post.

Tetris didn't make the list in my first post because it didn't exist yet when I started coding.

I'm curious to know what you mean by this! biggrin.png

It means I started programing before Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris in 1984.

Edited by latch
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I'm surprised Tetris didn't make the list in the first post.

Tetris didn't make the list in my first post because it didn't exist yet when I started coding.

I'm curious to know what you mean by this! biggrin.png

It means I started programing before Alexey Pajitnov wrote Tetris in 1984.

Ah, alright. I was wondering because I didn't see how that would keep it from appearing in your original post.

Thus i thought you meant when you started your latest project or something along those lines.

 

Your original post mentions nothing in regards to the time of original release.

Edited by SuperVGA
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