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BUCHANKO

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25 posts in this topic


  • I can only guess that Visual C++ is the best compiler to be using ?
  • Which DirectX would I require and where do I get it ? There are so many different versions it's all confusing, I believe I should be getting a DirectX SDK ? The latest I found linked to something to do with Windows 8, I don't even want to go near Windows 8 or they "Windows store" and whatnot.
  • Just to make it clear, DirectX is free for whatever use right ?
  • Where would I find an up-to date tutorial, dealing with C++ ? Most are outdated and based on C.


Thing is there is no best compiler as this comes down to personal preference, but MSVC++ is not a bad choice and the IDE is strong.
You would need to use DX11 there is not point in learning the older versions, if you are on Windows 8 just get the Windows 8 SDK and Direct X is included. Any other version of windows after vista get the DirectX SDK latest of this is June 2010. Both can be gotten from the MSDN website and are free.

If you do want to use DX11.1 features of the latest GPU's you are going to have to get the windows 8 SDK sadly as that is the only way to get at the features. Getting the Windows 8 SDK by the way in now way means you need to have windows 8 or aren't able to develop for past versions of windows, it just means you have the latest API for windows installed. Edited by NightCreature83
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The full 2012 edition of Visual Studio is fine, it's just that the Express editions of whatever version are the free ones, the professional versions are just a limited trial unless you can pay for it or you're a student (see https://www.dreamspark.com/Product/Product.aspx?productid=44 but note that it won't come with a commercial license.)

 

For the different versions of directx, when Vista and directx 10 came out, the new versions were no longer compatible with Windows XP. So directx 10 or 11 will run on Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8, but directx 9 will run on all these plus Windows XP. It's really pretty safe at this point to only do directx 11, unless you're really trying to support older hardware, (I'm pretty sure I don't know anyone who plays games and still has only XP) I'll probably be using dx11 for my next game for what it's worth, but maybe it's worth it to include a dx9 version.

 

It looks like the Windows 8 SDK at that link also includes the directx SDK, so either one should be fine, I guess that one includes a lot of other features. I'm currently using all XNA and I haven't worked in directx since before Windows 8 came out, so I'm not really up to date, especially on the 11.1 features.

 

I actually thought the directx tutorial website was ok, but if there's one best source I'd still say it's the DirectX Sample Browser that's installed with the SDK. It has a lot of tutorials and samples, plus gives you working demos that you can run and edit for each of the samples.

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Get visual studio express 2012 for desktop.  Get the directx sdk june 2010.  Maybe check out www.directxtutorial.com some of it is free.

 

I suggest start learning using directx9.0c.  You can start with fixed function or shaders with that version.  The main reason I suggest it, is that it has functions for loading .x mesh files.  Blender comes with a .x file exporter, you just have to activate it in the settings menu.

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  • I can only guess that Visual C++ is the best compiler to be using ?
  • Which DirectX would I require and where do I get it ? There are so many different versions it's all confusing, I believe I should be getting a DirectX SDK ? The latest I found linked to something to do with Windows 8, I don't even want to go near Windows 8 or they "Windows store" and whatnot.
  • Just to make it clear, DirectX is free for whatever use right ?
  • Where would I find an up-to date tutorial, dealing with C++ ? Most are outdated and based on C.

 

-Visual Studio is the best IDE.  Get the free version of VS 2012

-Get DirectX 11 SDK from Microsoft's site, whatever the latest release is.

-DirectX is free

-I'd suggest to get a good book on DirectX 11.  As far as C++ tutorials, there's lots of good info all over, and good books.

 

So, you can get VS2012 and the DX SDK, then find a good DX 11 book that has small sample projects to work through, and do those.  After that you should be ready to go out on your own.  At that point I'd recommend choosing a small game idea and making that.

 

There's also many threads around here with advice for beginners on things like what are good starting projects, what you should focus on, and many other things relating to making games when you're just starting out.  Find those threads, or just ask... I'm sure many here can point you to them.

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Please see the first quoted reply

Go here http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng/downloads#d-2012-express

 

The express edition of VS2012 is free, with only a few restrictions (no plugins like visual assist).

 

DirectX11 works on windows7, providing your video card supports it http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=6812

 

As far as tutorials go, check out my previous post.

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That's what I was talking about, it's a 30 day trial that requires some company related form to be filled out.

So fill in the info for Personal Use, the 1-person company whose CEO you are and which is registered at your home address.
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What about this then? >.<

That's the windows SDK, not the Directx SDK.

 

That's what I was talking about, it's a 30 day trial that requires some company related form to be filled out.

That page has a link to both the web installer and the iso for the express edition of VS2012. I was able to install without any trouble. It is a 30 day trial, but registration is free :

 

"After installation, you can try this product for up to 30 days. You must register to obtain a free product key for ongoing use after 30 days."

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What about this then? >.<

That's the windows SDK, not the Directx SDK.

Microsoft made DirectX a part of Windows and no longer a standalone SDK as noone is using the sound or input features of the SDK the only real thing in use is D3D and as such they moved it. So for future versions of D3D you will have to download and install the windows sdk as that now contains what you want to use.

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Microsoft made DirectX a part of Windows

Ah, my bad :) I'm still using the June 2010 DXSDK... although I have the windows sdk installed so maybe I should switch over.

 

Cheers!

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Introduction:

 

Hello everyone,

 

This is my first post on the forums, so I thought starting at "beginners" is always a good idea.

 

Basically I have completed a course on C++ as well as Java and wish to go into big game development.

 

Problem:

 

I have chosen C++ and DirectX (I suppose that will be Direct3D) due to maximum performance and most flexible control (low-level ?), in high hopes I have made the right decisions.

 

Unfortunately I am a "fresh A4 list" when it comes to graphics programming or non-web game development. I am lost with the choices I made and ask for guidance:

  • I can only guess that Visual C++ is the best compiler to be using ?
  • Which DirectX would I require and where do I get it ? There are so many different versions it's all confusing, I believe I should be getting a DirectX SDK ? The latest I found linked to something to do with Windows 8, I don't even want to go near Windows 8 or they "Windows store" and whatnot.
  • Just to make it clear, DirectX is free for whatever use right ?
  • Where would I find an up-to date tutorial, dealing with C++ ? Most are outdated and based on C.

 

Hey, I'm glad you have choosen the awesome path of C++ and DirectX. Both are great for maximum graphics performance and both are actively used for AAA titles, so make no mistake - you are on the right way.

 

1. Yes Visual C++ is the best by far. You can grab the free Visual Studio 2012 express for Desktop. It's completely free and can be used for product builds for free as well. You do have to register, but noone checks information you provide - key will be granted to you almost immediately after you push Submit. See this video.

2. You can choose between old SDK (June 2010) and new one which is already built in Windows 8 SDK, installed on your PC with VS 2012 Express. The last SDK doesnt have D3DX-helper components from previous one. But it's not a bad thing, since those part are never used in production. As a very big plus, you will actually learn how to handle model files, lights, textures and other type of things by yourself and understand this process instead of relaying on MS-provided D3DX library. Additionaly there won't be any D3DXVECTOR3 types from previous DirectX10 math library - DirectXMath is the new one, which is based on XNA Math and is now official math library for DirectX 11.

3. Yes DirectX is completely free.

4. I'd suggest you to start right from DirectX11, since it allows you to run your programs on DirectX9-DirectX11.1 hardware alltogether (by disabling new features on old hardware, ofcourse). Here is a good guide for DirectX11. However don't hesitate to look at DirectX10 examples as well, because DirectX10-DirectX11 interfaces are almost the same, excluding some few advanced features, provided in latest.

 

You will not find a good guide specially dedicated to Windows 8 DirectX SDK (well this one is the only one, which comes into my mind), but you can use the D3DX ones anyway, just wrap your head over getting reed of old D3DX-helpers. Learning without books is a hard choise for beginner. However, if you change your mind, I strongly recommend you to look at Frank De Luna DirectX 10-11 books - they are perfect.

 

If you don't want to use the lattest MS suggestions, just grab VS2012 Express and July 2010 DirectX SDK and copy-paste linked tutorials =)

 

Good luck!

Edited by GuardianX
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DirectX 11 vs. 11.1: For Windows 7 and Windows Vista, you can continue to use the same DirectX 11.0 APIs as always even with this update installed. The only thing you have to do is to install the updated SDK Debug Layers to restore D3D11_CREATE_DEVICE_DEBUG functionality. If you want to take advantage of some of the new DirectX 11.1 APIs now available on Windows 7 as well, you need to use the Windows 8.0 SDK with VS 2010 or VS 2012 rather than continuing to use the legacy DirectX SDK. See Where is the DirectX SDK? and DirectX SDKs of a certain age for details.

 

 

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/chuckw/archive/2013/02/26/directx-11-1-and-windows-7-update.aspx

Edited by EddieV223
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Oh, so Once I install Express Visual Studio 2012 I will also have DX11.1 which is the latest ?

 

That's right. DirectX SDK is now the part of Windows 8 SDK, which will be installed with Visual Studio, so you don't have to install anything by yourself and don't have to configure additional include folders in your project settings.

 

If you gonna use it, don't forget what I mentioned before about D3DX helpers (like D3DXVECTOR3, D3DXMATRIX, D3DXCreateEffectFromFile and others). Almost all of tutorials out there are based around using those helpers, but they are deprecated in Windows 8 SDK.

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noone is using the sound or input features of the SDK

Out of curiosity, why not?


I shouldn't have said no-one to be honest these API's however haven't changed since DX8 and in the case of the media extensions there are better alternatives(Bink, custom VP8 encoder/decoder) out there even for the Audio libs there are better options (Fmod and Wwise come to mind). MS recommends you not use DirectInput for mouse, keyboard or XInput Devices however as well which makes DirectInput of less use nowadays.

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