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Olliepm

Oliver's Questions

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Hey all!  I'm currently developing a research project for a unit in my college course, and the project it's self is specifically related to game audio.         I wondered if I might find some useful ideas or information from some of the great minds on this forum, and as the project is on going (and I'm bound to have more questions as time goes on) I've made a thread - just for me!  While this may seem a little self-involved, I've come to realize something quite special about the community of game audio professionals, and enthusiasts; and that is that I could never have dreamed of such a willingly helpful community.  I basically know how accepting you all are.  Every sound designer I've ever contacted has happily responded and granted me the help I needed.  Sincerely, I thank all who frequently respond the repetitive queries of beginners, and those wishing to break in to the industry.  Your input is invaluable, and without you we don't stand a chance.

 

I don't wish to bore anyone with the details of the full project, but the basic overview is that it must demonstrate an understanding and use of the knowledge and skills that I have gained studying this year of sound production. My final product will be a simple demo reel, with my own audio replacing that of gameplay footage (which game is undecided at this point).  Game audio, as far as the criteria is concerned, is a little ways 'off the beaten path' of this course, but my plan was approved by the lecturer.  One of the key areas I must research and tie into my project is the study of acoustics - which I am struggling with somewhat. I'm looking for any help regarding how the acoustic behaviors of sound in the real world are emulated in 3D game environments.  How much of an understanding of reverb is required when designing sound for games?  Does a sound designer ever consider the inverse square law when creating attenuation?

 

 

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Hey Ollie,

I'm looking for any help regarding how the acoustic behaviors of sound in the real world are emulated in 3D game environments.  How much of an understanding of reverb is required when designing sound for games?  Does a sound designer ever consider the inverse square law when creating attenuation?

As specialized as game audio may seem, I think people still have very varying focuses.
No doubt there are people whose job it is to consider acoustic details, outlining a realistic audio environment, but that's probably more in the hands of audio programmers. Most people doing the creative work are using tools already fit for the job, especially nowadays: from algorithmic and impulse response reverb AUs/VSTs/RTASs over audio middleware like FMOD or Wwise to dedicated audio engines.

And while I've studied that stuff for a few semesters ("systematic musicology" is what they call it over here), rare is the case where I have to pull out the old calculator to make things sound the way I want them to sound, and I'm very very glad about that.
On the other hand, knowing some basic acoustics never hurt either, even if it's just to set up a proper monitoring environment or to get a good starting point when choosing and positioning microphones in the studio.

But I can only speak for myself, really. Hope it helped though?

Cheers,
Moritz Edited by Moritz P.G. Katz
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Of course it helped!  As long as I find a way to write about my understanding of acoustics within this project, then I'm golden.  This may mean, if for example I find that your response is the general consensus of everyone,that I have a have a harder job of doing so, but I'll find a way.  Thanks!

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Hey Oliver,

 

There's probably way too much to cover in a forum post

If you'd like, feel free to give me a call and I'd be happy to answer questions you have about acoustics and gamesound.

 

You can find my phone # on my web site.

 

Best,

brian 

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Hey Oliver,

 

There's probably way too much to cover in a forum post

If you'd like, feel free to give me a call and I'd be happy to answer questions you have about acoustics and gamesound.

 

You can find my phone # on my web site.

 

Best,

brian 

Wow, thank you!  I may just reserve that privilege, if it stands, till next academic year, where I will be working on a bigger project.  My current project only lasts twelve weeks, and I only need to tie in acoustic to a certain extent.  The whole project loses it's connection to game sound on a certain level, due to the fact I've had to tailor it to meet the requirements of a general audio production assessment.   It's very kind of you to offer your time, though, and I'd be crazy not to take you up on it sometime.  The long distance charge is something I'd need to look into, mind you.smile.png

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