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TropicMonkey

What software or programs does a beginner need to get started in game developing?

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I am completely new to game development and I want to get started learning how to make games as soon as possible. However, first I need to know what programs or software I will need to get started. I have heard that I will need Java Development Kit, NetBeans (IDE), Adobe Photoshop, and Blender. Is this correct or do I need additional software? By the way, I plan to start making 2D games as that is probably easier to learn at first than 3D. Also, I want to use Java as my programming language.

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First, you need to grasp the Java language, just write a few text based programs/games to start. If you haven't already gotten an IDE (an IDE is a programming environment where you can edit code, build your application, and test your application), get one. Eclipse is very popular for Java. Then grab an API that'll let you do graphics. I use SFML with C++ when working with 2D, so I bet the Java SFML bindings would be pretty good too. Check it out here: http://en.sfml-dev.org/forums/index.php?topic=4938.0

 

Other than that, all I can say is follow some tutorials, and Google is your friend.

 

http://zetcode.com/tutorials/javagamestutorial/

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/java-game-programming-part-i-the-basics-r1262

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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

 

Dont you generally just assume close to zero prior experience unless otherwise stated?  I do, not sure why.

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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

 

Dont you generally just assume close to zero prior experience unless otherwise stated?  I do, not sure why.

 

Well, I don't want to respond with, "Stop what you're doing and learn to program first." Also, there have been times where someone may know, as an example, Python, but heard that it's slow. So then they ask if they should be using C++ or C or even Java. So I ask just to get an understanding of where someone is, before doling out advice. Plus, if you don't have a solid programming background and try to use C++ & SFML or Python & PyGame, then it just causes more problems and takes longer to learn what you are supposed to learn. In some unfortunate cases, the person just gives up altogether.

 

Not to be off-topic, but have you finished that SFML tutorial yet?

Edited by Alpha_ProgDes
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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

 

Dont you generally just assume close to zero prior experience unless otherwise stated?  I do, not sure why.

 

Well, I don't want to respond with, "Stop what you're doing and learn to program first." Also, there have been times where someone may know, as an example, Python, but heard that it's slow. So then they ask if they should be using C++ or C or even Java. So I ask just to get an understanding of where someone is, before doling out advice. Plus, if you don't have a solid programming background and try to use C++ & SFML or Python & PyGame, then it just causes more problems and takes longer to learn what you are supposed to learn. In some unfortunate cases, the person just gives up altogether.

 

Not to be off-topic, but have you finished that SFML tutorial yet?

 

 

unsure.png Ummmmm.....

 

 

It's a momentum thing...  Ive tried to finish it a number of times, but somehow, whatever I write is crap.  I should have finished it while I had my C++ hat on.  In the year since, I've been working a lot in C# ( PS Mobile ), Lua and JavaScript... hard to go back to C++ when your brain is in high level land. :)

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I understand. I've been using Racket (through HtDP) for the past couple of months. And oddly enough, when I look at C# or VB.net, I shiver. Well I hope you get around to finishing it, sooner than later :)

 

Back on-topic, if the OP hasn't programmed in a lot of Java yet, then he should pick up a Java book (How to Program in Java, for example) and go through that book. Then venture into [graphical] game development, IMO. Anyone can plenty of text games in Java. They're easy to do once you know the language.

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Ive tried to finish it a number of times, but somehow, whatever I write is crap.

(Going back off topic again; sorry)

 

Not sure if you two are talking about an article for one of your own websites, or if you're talking about an article for the GameDev article database...but if it's the latter, then I could help you with wording and formatting and such, if that's what you think you're having trouble with.  Just shoot me a PM if you want.

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Ive tried to finish it a number of times, but somehow, whatever I write is crap.

(Going back off topic again; sorry)

 

Not sure if you two are talking about an article for one of your own websites, or if you're talking about an article for the GameDev article database...but if it's the latter, then I could help you with wording and formatting and such, if that's what you think you're having trouble with.  Just shoot me a PM if you want.

 

 

Final off topic post.... :)

 

Thanks for the offer, but talking about the tutorial linked in my sig.  I got to part 9 (or was it 10?) and just kinda stopped.  It's pretty complete, and thats kinda why I never finished.  There isn't really all that much more I want to cover... smart pointers, and thats about it, but I just cant bring myself to actually finish it.

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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

I know no computer programming languages, lol. But I think Java will be a good start for me. Only thing I'm having trouble with right now is knowing what software and programs to install so I can get started learning through tutorials. I'm kind of stuck without knowing this, but I've done a decent amount of research. I'm comprehending some concepts but sometimes I still get lost with the computer talk and abbreviations such as IMO and API. 

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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

I know no computer programming languages, lol. But I think Java will be a good start for me. Only thing I'm having trouble with right now is knowing what software and programs to install so I can get started learning through tutorials. I'm kind of stuck without knowing this, but I've done a decent amount of research. I'm comprehending some concepts but sometimes I still get lost with the computer talk and abbreviations such as IMO and API. 

 

Ah. Well there's nothing wrong with Java :) So download the latest JDK and download Netbeans or Eclipse (either one is fine, they're both IDEs). I would start with looking for a good book on Java and working through that. Then come back to game development. You're gonna need the development skills to be solid first before you go off and start developing games.

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I honestly don't see a reason to learn Java when you are starting from scratch and aiming for game dev. Not that it's terrible - just clunkier and less productive than many other options. I'd recommend Scala or Python instead. Java doesn't even have an ecosystem advantage; you can use all Java libraries directly from Scala.

You don't need graphics software to get started, just basic programming tools.

Also, while Blender is free, Photoshop is hideously expensive. You probably want to hold off on that until you are working on something you expect to actually sell.
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I tried to read this on my phone and think I got the gist of it (small text lol). There is no set in stone toolset a you need to start. Toolsets depend on stuff like the programming language used, etc. If you don't know any languages, And are interested in the programming side of development, Java and Python are great languages. In this case you would use a text editor or IDE that supports the languages. If you know another language, try and learn C. The tools will change.

For the art side of things - I find it to be mostly personal preference, unless you are working with specific pipelines/file types. Stuff like GIMP and Photoshop basically do the same things and support much of the same formats, the only difference is the price, which as someone above me said, don't buy into unless it is a product you are planning to sell and make some money on (even then)...
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I honestly don't see a reason to learn Java when you are starting from scratch and aiming for game dev. Not that it's terrible - just clunkier and less productive than many other options. I'd recommend Scala or Python instead. Java doesn't even have an ecosystem advantage; you can use all Java libraries directly from Scala.

You don't need graphics software to get started, just basic programming tools.

Also, while Blender is free, Photoshop is hideously expensive. You probably want to hold off on that until you are working on something you expect to actually sell.

 

Okay I think I'll still use Java though because it seems to be more popular. And like you said, Photoshop is way to expensive, but now I know I don't need any graphics software to get started anyway. 

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Read me, and I will answer all of your questions.  Money back guarantee!

 

 

Granted... it was free...

 

But wait, you should read me. Not only am I free, I'm easy too! smile.png

 

But I do want to ask two things, what languages do you know right now? And how much experience do you have with programming in general?

I know no computer programming languages, lol. But I think Java will be a good start for me. Only thing I'm having trouble with right now is knowing what software and programs to install so I can get started learning through tutorials. I'm kind of stuck without knowing this, but I've done a decent amount of research. I'm comprehending some concepts but sometimes I still get lost with the computer talk and abbreviations such as IMO and API. 

 

Ah. Well there's nothing wrong with Java smile.png So download the latest JDK and download Netbeans or Eclipse (either one is fine, they're both IDEs). I would start with looking for a good book on Java and working through that. Then come back to game development. You're gonna need the development skills to be solid first before you go off and start developing games.

 

Okay, thanks for the help. I think I know everything I need to know now to get started smile.png

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