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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Xanather

3 Monitors

5 posts in this topic

Im going to be replacing my old chunky TV with a new TV that will end up being mounted above my desk, and so I thought about 3 monitor setup and watching movies on the 3rd screen (the TV) whenever I want... This is just a idea, currently 2 monitors is fine obviously.

 

My current GTX 570 only supports 2 monitors. What would happen though if I were to get a very cheap GTS 620 (to allow for 3 monitors) how would it work? Do I need to set anything up with the nvidia drivers to make sure only my current GTX 570 does the processing?

If I were to run a game on the display that the GTS 620 was outputting what would happen? Would the GTX 570 still do the GPU processing?

 

All replies are appriciated smile.png

Edited by Xanather
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I've done this before, but with a GTX 260 and a GeForce 7 providing the 3rd output port.
I found that with a windowed mode app, it would run at full speed until I dragged it onto the 3rd screen. As soon as it was even partially on the 3rd screen, the performance would plummet. With a fullscreen app, the app can explicitly choose which GPU(s) it uses, but most don't give the user control over this decision, nor do they support processing on one and displaying on another -- most just use whichever GPU you open the window on (often the 'primary' monitor).

One workaround is to configure your screens not to be independent desktops, but to use the 'clone' mode, or the mode that makes them act as one giant-res screen.

Another workaround that I used for some games was to place a fake d3d9.dll in their directory, which created two GPU devices, processing on the fast one, then copying he final images across to he slow one manually... But I wouldn't try this with any games with anti-cheat mechanisms as it might be flagged as a potential aim-bot, etc!

Probably easier to plug your main monitor and TV into the fast card, and your 2ndary monitor into the second card.
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Ahh well that sucks, thanks for that. I might still do this though, as you say, my 2nd monitor is only used for basic stuff displaying the taskbar, browsing etc... while the 1st one is used for programming/games.

 

Disappointing that the version of my GTX 570 isnt sold anymore so SLI would not be a option (cant get 600 series either - long story, would need a new cpu).

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You can always try eBay and/or the local equivalents to find a 2nd GPU for SLI wink.png

 

[edit]Actually, now that I think about it, everything that I said applies to Windows XP... I don't think I had upgraded to Win7 at that point. I haven't tried using that same hardware setup on Win7, so it could be different now.

Edited by Hodgman
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Yeah, I actually thought about that aswell (GTX 260/GeForce 7xxx is pretty old now :P), you might be right. I just cant find any details about this on google, thats why I posted here, I have no idea what keywords to search.

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Another workaround that I used for some games was to place a fake d3d9.dll in their directory, which created two GPU devices, processing on the fast one, then copying he final images across to he slow one manually... But I wouldn't try this with any games with anti-cheat mechanisms as it might be flagged as a potential aim-bot, etc!

You did that? That's badass.
Gotta live to your +11000 reputation smile.png
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