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Pyrotemplar

Where to start and where to go from here

7 posts in this topic

Hello everyone,

 

my name is Pyrotemplar, i am new to this forums, ever since i was in high school i wanted to be a game developer, after community college i attend a university where i earned a BS in Computer Science, where i took most of my classes in c++ with 1 java elective. after grudation i started working for a software development company where i undertook a 8 weeks training course in java-core-servlets-jsp-spring-hibernate. i been at this company for 4 month now as a Software engineer/java developer and i have also become Java Programmer certified. 

 

i do not have any game developer experience, about  2 days ago i decided to start by making a pong game in java, i followed a tutorial for Space invader but manipulated the code for pong, the game it self is only basics, ball movement, collision detection and keyboard input. nothing fancy but after all it is my first game.

 

i have about 2-3 years of C++ school experience and about 4 month of java(working mainly on websites back-end servlets and spring)

 

where should i go from here?

 

p.s. i read here that i should submit my code for a code review, where would i do that?

 

thank you.

 

 

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If you are already good at c++ then maybe look into sfml, its a good object oriented, cross platform lib for 2d games.

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Hi,

 

Language of choice which supports your job is far greater than any other consideration.  I put C# on the shelf for game development though I like it because a job position calls for me to use Java, so here I am learning Java!  Now I learn game dev with Java because work is top priority and it supports my advancement in the job!

 

Because it supports your job in Java and you have a course established with it, why switch back to C++?  Think strategically.  Keep the language which you use in your job and a language for game development which will allow the experience of both to help one another.  Java is plenty powerful to meet all your needs for years to come before you outgrow it - if ever.  Plus, Java has some advantages for cross-platform down the road.  I am not a fan of someone in early stages of game development to use more than one language at a time until at least intermediate proficiency in the language for game development.  Later you can return to C++.

 

 

In your case, I recommend making a couple more console type 2D games with Java:

 

Crossword Puzzle (Harder than it seems when you add features like color and sound effects for completing lines, maybe even a pop-up window saying "Good answer!" or something)

 

Tic Tac Toe

Tetris

Pac Man

Defender

Asteroids

Etc

Etc.

 

Perhaps you should start from scratch with Pong.  Finish each game really well. Add features not found in the original game!  Don't publish them because of copyright, but you can experiment in private all you want with the concepts.

 

After a few months and a couple more console 2D games, then look at jMonkey, written entirely in Java.  It is really kick-ass engine and has a supportive, knowledgeable community.

 

Strategic thinking will go a long way in accelerating both your job and your game development, so I hope you understand that opportunity. 

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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You can post your code reviews in any of the appropriate forums. If you're a beginner, then in For Beginners. If you're more seasoned (doing this for 3 or more years or have written several games), then the Game Programming forum. If it's not game related but programming related and it's something like ECS, red-black trees, or visitor patterns, then post in General Programming. And so on and so forth.

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thanks everyone, im looking into slick2d and playing around with it, i really like it and im going to stick with java for now. since im still really new to it and would like to learn more.

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