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Alpha_ProgDes

Do we need a Code Review forum?

11 posts in this topic

I'm sure the immediate answer is no. However, slowly but surely, I'm seeing more people, for the most part beginners, completing projects and posting their code for review. So, in the very likely case that we will not be having a code review forum, what would be the best way to go about having anyone post code that they want the community to review and comment on? Your thoughts? Personally, I don't know. That's why I'm asking.

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Counter Question - If their code works, why would they post for review ?  Normally, the post I see of code is because it does not work.  When my code works, I am happy, and I press on.  How about forming something to help young coders market their talents.  Or a Testers group.  A group formed to test compiled cose and give feedback ?

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Counter Question - If their code works, why would they post for review ?  Normally, the post I see of code is because it does not work.  When my code works, I am happy, and I press on.

Umm.. because sometimes you want to know how you could improve your design and generally write more elegant code? Going at it with the mindset that "if it compiles, it works" is a surefire way to get yourself in a productivity black hole once your code becomes impossible to maintain (and too expensive to refactor) as a result of brainless code-monkeying.

 

Code review does not mean "this does not work, fix it", it means "so I've done this, but this method here looks kind of awkward, how can I improve my interface to expose the minimum functionality possible while keeping it flexible, I need to query the database twice here, how could I refactor to require only one lookup, etc..", that kind of stuff.

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I like the idea. It seems like it would be very useful for people wanting to learn additional ways to solve problems.

But it might not be very convenient using the forum. Posting and quoting chunks of code is painful. We use tools at work let you view changes and add inline comments (like on Github or using Phabricator). We would need some tool like that integrated with (or linked from) this site for it to be truly excellent.
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If their code works, why would they post for review ? Normally, the post I see of code is because it does not work. When my code works, I am happy, and I press on.


In a lot of corporate coding environments, after you've finished a task but before you commit your work to the main project repository, you first go through a code review. This is where you and some colleagues go through the code to spot any subtle bugs that might not have manifested yet, spot any performance / resource usage pitfalls and to consider ways that the code could be simplified, e.g to reduce coupling and be made more maintainable.
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I like the idea but I must admit I get turned off by posts that open up with reams and reams of source code. I think such a forum would have to be somewhat structured to avoid it becoming a code dumping ground.

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How would the other forums be moderated? Does it mean any topic that is started with source code in it must be moved to the code review forum? That could be a pain to moderate... unless it is made very clear, especially for new members.

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How would the other forums be moderated? Does it mean any topic that is started with source code in it must be moved to the code review forum? That could be a pain to moderate... unless it is made very clear, especially for new members.

 

I think it'd be a diffrence between if the poster is indicating they want their code to be checked over, or are just having a problem.

 

Personally, I can't say i've seen a decent volume of code review request posts that it warrants it's own forum yet.  But that's just me.

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It's not like the requests are overflowing, however there has been a steady uptick in them lately. Plus, as developers I would think we would want a place to post code for review, if we wanted it. The question, that I have, is what's the best way to go about it. Should we have groundrules, templates, certain tags (as examples)? Should there be a forum? Should we just tell other users to post elsewhere and post a link here?

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Counter Question - If their code works, why would they post for review ?  Normally, the post I see of code is because it does not work.  When my code works, I am happy, and I press on.

 

You need to define what you mean by "works"?  Does it compile clean?  Are there subtle bugs?  Does it run fast?  Does it integrate well?  Is it maintainable?  Is it even readable?  Todays working code can quite easily become an absolute nightmare in 6 months time, and one of the reasons for reviewing code is to help prevent that from happening.

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I think this would be a good idea. I know that I, personally, have had a couple instances where I've completed a task, but I knew it was either slow or hackish, and I sought out advice from an outside perspective to find out what someone else thinks about it.

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