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jacknbiecdr

[Question] Creating a windows application in c++?

10 posts in this topic

Nope. Try Qt or wxWidgets. wink.png

 

Win32 will certainly work, but it'll be alot of pain. Whatever you do, there'll be a learning curve, but IMO, Win32 is so low level that it's more of a learning wall than a curve.

Qt and wxWidgets are at a higher level of abstraction that makes it easier to get things up and running, while still retaining the same flexibility and power, with the added benefit of being cross-platform to Windows, Macintosh, and Linux.

 

Your mileage may vary.

Edited by Servant of the Lord
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Small dialog based apps aren't too bad, since the DefaultDialogProc handles quite a bit for you. Unless you just want to create a canvas for DirectX or openGL or whatever.

 

Otherwise, don't do it. It's tedious.

 

I'd use C# if I wanted a big Windows application these days. I used to do MFC in C++ but that was painful.

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i just recently search about good api creator and found this QT very interesting and now downloading. thank you for the reply very much appreciated :)

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Even libraries like Qt will use win32 ( on windows ) some where inside but it is abstracted away.  So why reinvent the wheel?  If you don't have a specific reason to work with win32, then you probably shouldn't.  Qt is a great library, so is wxWidgets.

 

I prefer Qt, it's easy to work with, has LOTs of other functionality not just GUI stuff.  Also has a cross platform IDE that IMO is second only to VS.

Edited by EddieV223
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The first time I encountered Win32 I sincerely contemplated firebombing the MS campus.

 

It's second nature now, but there should at least be a warning label IMO.

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The first time I encountered Win32 I sincerely contemplated firebombing the MS campus.

 

It's second nature now, but there should at least be a warning label IMO.

 

What's second nature? Win32, or desiring to incinerate Microsoft? laugh.png

 

Oh, you caught that one, did you? wink.png

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For a simple "game window" Win32 really isn't that bad at all. For anything beyond a simple canvas for rendering then go with a higher level framework. If it's a full on Windows-style GUI app then I'd be more inclined to go for another language like C# (but that's just me).

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One more thing that you should consider when choosing your GUI platform is the license  of each GUI library and/or API .
 
Qt for example, has a dual license:
0. A paid-comercial license provided by digia for pure proprietary software.
1. A LGPL license that forces the folowing restrictions (for commercial applications):
You must->
0. Expose the interfaces for the free software components to end users.
1. Povide your app's object files.
2. Encapsulate the free software components inside a dynamic link library.
(If and only if you distribute your software to others)
 
GTK+ which is really brilliant, has a LGPL license as well.
 
WxWidgets has it's own license that lets you release your proprietary software without the need to expose anything as long as you disterbute your app in a binary form.
 
A word in regards to the win32 API:
 
The windows API gives you, by far, more power and flexibility than any other API listed (in the cost of implementing a huge set of things by yourself), 
for Windows operating systems.
It is true that it has a quite steep learning curve, although it is brilliantly documented, rich, fast and beautiful !
Also, it is required if you attempt to create a pure DirectX application. 
+ you can release your GUI components without any restrictions.
Edited by Eliad Moshe
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