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What's you favorite and most hated part of coding?

49 posts in this topic

For me it's coding "editors", be it terrain editors or texture editors, or both(usually).Pretty much everything involving brushes.
My most frustrating would be lighting grr.
How about you?

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I love prototyping games, and getting the basic builds up.

I hate polishing off the ui stuff, and making all the buttons. I'm perfectly fine with making things work by pressing a key, and using simple text to represent the state of things(such as health/mana/stamina). But alas not everyone enjoys that...simplicity, it's just boring to position an ui label, write the code to make it say something, position button, write the code to make it do stuff, etc. then you've gatta make sure they all look nice, and flow right. it's just so boring.
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I like nice separate chunks of functionality that i get something out of (graphical results etc.)

 

I dont like when i have to engineer an overly complex algorithm/data structure with an insane looking data flow that then never works and i spend the next week fixing all the logic errors. And then it seems like it works, and i go add an extra feature, and notice its till broken and all my "fixes" were just replacing functioning code with something that hides some other bug somewhere else in the code.

 

Or something like that.

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I like nice separate chunks of functionality that i get something out of (graphical results etc.)

 

I dont like when i have to engineer an overly complex algorithm/data structure with an insane looking data flow that then never works and i spend the next week fixing all the logic errors. And then it seems like it works, and i go add an extra feature, and notice its till broken and all my "fixes" were just replacing functioning code with something that hides some other bug somewhere else in the code.

 

Or something like that.

it sounds like you don't like unit testing.

 

I don't like build authoring and logging.

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My favorite part of coding is finding that solution to a weird and obscure bug that's been around for a long time.  After already trying to fix it and failing, when you're taking a shower the next day and suddenly, BOOM!  You run to the computer, code it up, golden light shines down from above, a choir sings in the background, and you feel like a programming wizard.  Until the next bug.

 

I hate three things: documentation, documentation, and documentation.

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After already trying to fix it and failing, when you're taking a shower the next day and suddenly, BOOM!

Man, I can't even count the number of times this has happened. I've started to take showers when i'm stuck on a particularly tough problem just for the fact that for w/e reason I can better work out problems in the shower. Edited by slicer4ever
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Man, I can't even count the number of times this has happened. I've started to take showers when i'm stuck on a particularly touch problem just for the fact that for w/e reason I can better work out problems in the shower.

 

I'm pretty sure if I had a water-proof white board in the shower I would already be a billionaire.  :D

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My favourite part is when I rock up, change large amounts of code and data flow and make huge cpu/gpu savings.

My least favourite part is when I'm stopped from murdering the people who caused the problem in the first place sad.png
(also, anything related to 'management' type things... *grumbles*)
(but mostly the murder part...)
(biggrin.png)
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I like being able to quickly throw things together and have some sort of immediate feedback.

 

I don't really like:

writing boilerplate (code that does nothing apart from help glue one thing to another);

having to make changes in a large number of places to add something (such as having to "route" things through a number of unrelated components, *1);

things like array overruns, bad pointers, threads stepping on each others' data, ...;

...

 

*1: this is presently an issue for most things which have to cross the client/server divide, which often involves fiddling with code in both the client and server parts of the engine, and also with the code for composing and processing the relevant messages, ...

 

another annoying issue recently has been me not wanting to require 64-bits, but having an engine with enough data (notably voxel terrain) that it doesn't really fit nicely in a 32-bit process (adding the issues of needing to deal more with memory-use management, in-memory compression, ...).

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My favorite part is deleting large quantities of code because I found a shorter/better way to do what I needed. My least favorite part is waiting for the compiler.

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I hate three things: documentation, documentation, and documentation.

I quite like writing documentation, though I tend to repeat myself and be overly consistent (this is a bug I'm working on). It helps me focus, and I'll often uncover logical inconsistencies and other design flaws while writing documentation.

 

My favourite part is when, after trying helplessly to fix a bit of code for hours or days, something "clicks", I write two lines of code, think to myself "ah, yeah" and voilà! it works flawlessly. Best programming feeling ever. For what it's worth, usually the problem stems from a misunderstanding of the assertions made throughout the code.

 

My least favourite part is probably polishing an application once all the fun hard problems have been solved to my satisfaction. This is why I tend to stick to POC's rather than full-fledged programs, because I stand a better chance of finishing them before I get bored.

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I can't decide what I like best about coding.  Writing the engine from scratch is very exciting, especially when it's cross platform and requires little modification to get it running on multiple OSes and devices.  Another thing I really take much interest in and really enjoy is (get ready to cringe), multi-threading!  I'm not a multithreading god, but I'm getting much better with thread synchronization, management, priorities, mutexes/events, but still haven't grasped semaphores, and I constantly forget what I learned about APCs.

 

What I absolutely hate is debugging, especially memory corruption related things.  Those tend to be the most annoying of them all.  Other than that, a second would be reading other people's code, especially when it's not commented, unorganized and OOP crazy like a C++ n00b.  Lastly, what I hate about coding is the fact that C# exists.  I'm sorry, but I hate it with a passion.

 

Shogun.

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I love solving really tough problems on my own. I dislike spending a ton of time on a single problem.

 

I love writing a long piece of code, then running it and finding out it has no bugs. I hate writing long pieces of code that I can't break up into smaller parts.

 

I love creating a ton of different parts at the same time. I dislike gluing them all together.

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My favorite part of coding is finding that solution to a weird and obscure bug that's been around for a long time.  After already trying to fix it and failing, when you're taking a shower the next day and suddenly, BOOM!  You run to the computer, code it up, golden light shines down from above, a choir sings in the background, and you feel like a programming wizard.  Until the next bug.

 

This is the truth.  The sad part is the most common fix to these "can't figure why it's not working" involves the smallest tweak in code.  (ie. Forgetting to set the 4th element in a vector to 1 from 0, and wondering why your point light position isn't working in your shader!);

:)

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I hate three things: documentation, documentation, and documentation.

I quite like writing documentation, though I tend to repeat myself and be overly consistent (this is a bug I'm working on). It helps me focus, and I'll often uncover logical inconsistencies and other design flaws while writing documentation.

I agree with this in the sense that explaining what I'm doing often gives me a lot of insight about what I am actually doing heh.

 

It happened to me a few times already, I have this problem that I cant fix, or this thing that I can't understand, so after a while I fire up Gamedev.net, press the new thread button and try to explain what I'm trying to do, how and where it lies my issue. At the end I somehow understand a lot better everything so I fix the thing by myself without ever posting the thread.

 

Its like what I'm doing is somewhere in my head and it becomes more clear once I try to explain it with words.

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I like writing exciting new features, and having something that encompasses a lot of intricate functionality. The faster, the better, but no matter what, on completion, I get that pride.

 

I dislike writing documentation, writing tests, and writing boilerplate.

 

In other words, I like doing things, and I don't like the prologue or epilogue.

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I can't decide what I like best about coding.  Writing the engine from scratch is very exciting, especially when it's cross platform and requires little modification to get it running on multiple OSes and devices.  Another thing I really take much interest in and really enjoy is (get ready to cringe), multi-threading!  I'm not a multithreading god, but I'm getting much better with thread synchronization, management, priorities, mutexes/events, but still haven't grasped semaphores, and I constantly forget what I learned about APCs.

 

What I absolutely hate is debugging, especially memory corruption related things.  Those tend to be the most annoying of them all.  Other than that, a second would be reading other people's code, especially when it's not commented, unorganized and OOP crazy like a C++ n00b.  Lastly, what I hate about coding is the fact that C# exists.  I'm sorry, but I hate it with a passion.

 

Shogun.

you hate debugging memory corruption and C#. Sounds like an oxymoron.

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I *love* writing documentation for my code.  Part of my development approach is what some calls it "document-driven development".  It's part of my thought process. I put my thoughts as comments as I write code, and those comments ultimately become the documentation.

 

I *hate* looking-up documentation.  Since I love writing it, I expect other people to document their code, especially if they expect other people to use it.  I'm currently using Ruby, and the gems are notoriously lacking documentation.  The "Documentation" page looks more like a README than a documentation.  I'm used to MSDN/.Net/Javadoc documentation.  Show me a list of all the classes and all the methods and their description and with some examples how to use them.  Nothing consumes more of my time if I have pull out Google, type-in my question, and browsing through the web for a solution.

Edited by alnite
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For me it's coding "editors", be it terrain editors or texture editors, or both(usually).Pretty much everything involving brushes.
My most frustrating would be lighting grr.
How about you?

Being told to write code to requirements that are vague at best, non-existent at worst (had to do this with a PHP project at a huge organization that will remain anonymous). <--- sucks!

All of the other parts of coding, meh, I either don't care, like it or love it. Edited by ysg
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I *love* writing documentation for my code.  Part of my development approach is what some calls it "document-driven development".  It's part of my thought process. I put my thoughts as comments as I write code, and those comments ultimately become the documentation.

Heh, most coders that I've known of, hate documentation as well smile.png . I kinda like writing documentation, sometimes just to relax a bit and not have to be super-focused in.
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I can't decide what I like best about coding.  Writing the engine from scratch is very exciting, especially when it's cross platform and requires little modification to get it running on multiple OSes and devices.  Another thing I really take much interest in and really enjoy is (get ready to cringe), multi-threading!  I'm not a multithreading god, but I'm getting much better with thread synchronization, management, priorities, mutexes/events, but still haven't grasped semaphores, and I constantly forget what I learned about APCs.

 

What I absolutely hate is debugging, especially memory corruption related things.  Those tend to be the most annoying of them all.  Other than that, a second would be reading other people's code, especially when it's not commented, unorganized and OOP crazy like a C++ n00b.  Lastly, what I hate about coding is the fact that C# exists.  I'm sorry, but I hate it with a passion.

 

Shogun.

you hate debugging memory corruption and C#. Sounds like an oxymoron.

 

I think there are good and bad points of C# IMO.

 

good points:

reasonably clean language design and not nearly as annoying to write code in IMO as Java;

compiles faster than C or C++;

bounds-checked arrays and similar;

doesn't require being recompiled per-target;

...

 

weak points:

it is overly pedantic regarding type conversions ("type-safety" == "casts everywhere");

its support on various non-Windows OS's is a bit weak (worse in embedded);

some nifty core language features in C or C++ have to be built manually in C#;

it is more annoying to declare immediate arrays or objects (vs C++);

a lot of trivial tasks require writing more code than in C or C++;

...

 

 

I still personally more prefer to use C and C++ with a custom script-language (though, C# and .NET were design influences regarding the script language and VM, ...).

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a lot of trivial tasks require writing more code than in C or C++;

I'm... confused by this statement... what do you mean by a 'trivial task' in this context?
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Thing I like : saying 'screw this noise, Future Rob can sort this problem out...'
Thing I dislike : becoming Future Rob and realising that Past Rob is a jerk for leaving me with stuff to sort out sad.png
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Anyone who thinks C# is a bad language has never used LINQ to write a data mining app in an afternoon.

 

 

Good fucking luck touching that kind of productivity in C++.

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