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Nicholas Kong

What is missing from my game?

8 posts in this topic

I am applying for a Quality Assurance Internship of Software development for a game development company and I have been working on this game in the span of 3 months. So I thought I ask "what I might be missing from my game to make me have a possibility of getting the internship?"

 

The art for the ship and picture labeled "-Life-" and heart image and ship projectile(not shown in picture) are art samples from a different game. They are used for place-holders to assist me in developing the vision of the game design faster. Am I suggested to not use copyrighted art in my game portfolio?

 

Here is a screenshot of the 2D game in action:

GameDesign_zpsc1832edc.png

 

What has been added:

- Monster Movement Animation and its skill animations

- Ship Health System (Remove hearts upon enemy skill collision on ship)

- Collision detection between enemy and projectile from ship.

- Collision detection between projectile from enemy to ship.

- Ship Movement (no animation) and its ability to fire projectile

- Ship Projectile (no animation)

- Game Over Logo replaced -Life- Image when your ship loses all the hearts

- Bug-free features

 

What am I working on now:

- Coming up with a design and coding implementation for a button-based main menu system

 

P.S. Nothing happens if you kill all the monsters on screen.

Edited by warnexus
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Hm, hard to say when nothing is mentioned about their requirements and job description.

 

Anyway: I would add some surrounding stuff like main menu, high scores, help, contact info and level system (you can have the same "level" for all "levels").

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Hm, hard to say when nothing is mentioned about their requirements and job description.

 

Anyway: I would add some surrounding stuff like main menu, high scores, help, contact info and level system (you can have the same "level" for all "levels").

Thanks. The job description is to be "interested in finding bugs in software" which I have been doing for 2 years in general programming.

Edited by warnexus
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I may be incorrect, but your sprites are not use tranparancy. That would probally be wise to make sure your eninge can accept it. Also until it has been used by many people (and as you are trying to get a job in bug detection) I wouldn't ever say my code is bug free. I mean don't put might be bugs, but I will assure you in every engine there are small "bugs" that can only be avoided with proper documentation of your engine. Also some things such as if someone else was to use your engine - would it crash/fail or would it throw an informative error message if I tried to allocate a texture that is larger than permitted (real bug), or in an invaid format (documentaion issue)?
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As it's a QA role, I'd be inclined to turn the question back to you. What, if anything, needs to be done with this game before you would be content to sign off on it as a quality piece of software?

 

Of course, I appreciate that it is much harder to QA your own code. Think of this is as an opportunity to challenge your QA skills.

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Monday morning paranoia: I was sitting in the shower this morning, scrubbing off the sins of the weekend. I realized, the OP's post resembles a lot of one of them "please do my homework for me" type of questions. If I was recruiting for a game company and wanted to test a future tester, the best way would be to show this person a sample game and ask for feedback. Like the OP did!

 

Edit: In retrospect, this was a stupid comment. I apologize to the OP and the forum. 

Edited by mipmap
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The op has other posts where he is asking about how to impliment different parts of the game. This leads me to believe he developed the game at least partly on his own.
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you gotta make this game bug-free ??
IS it bug-free ?
do you want it to be realy complicated and thus easier to make/oversee bugs or the opposite ??

specifics Op, you're just showing a game that nobody would realy want to play unless it was on a smartphone,

and that's okay, because you re not trying to sell it, but tell us what your goals with it actually are.

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