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jenny_wui

Some clarification about 1 File, 2 File etc.

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Hello, I have attached  screen  shot where some raw image files have been named as 1 File type, 2 File type etc. When I try to click the individual file, it shows file type 1 File (.1). Could any one explain a bit more about this file type. Thanks.

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It may not be a file type. Windows will say the type is whatever extension the file has (ie the last bit of text after the period/dot). Go into your folder options and uncheck "Hide known file extensions" and the other 3 file types will be shown (.1, .2, .3). Apparently your computer recognizes that those file types belong to some application.

 

Those also could just be the order the shots were taken.

Edited by Dragonsoulj

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Hello, I have attached  screen  shot where some raw image files have been named as 1 File type, 2 File type etc. When I try to click the individual file, it shows file type 1 File (.1). Could any one explain a bit more about this file type. Thanks.

It's not a file type. It's just part of the file name. I'm guessing, and it's a complete guess, that the one of the "quarter" files (one of the three at the top) uses the other "quater.N" (where N is a number) to do... something... maybe create a graphic?

 

I'm imagining it like this: imagine you have a file, named quarter, and it's an image. A huge image. You decide to segment it into lots of smaller files. You then segment the image into N segments, and name them all quarter.0, quarter.1, quarter.2, quarter.3, etc. With this segmenting method and naming convention, the quarter file knows that it just needs to look at all quater.N files to find the relevant data. The number at the end just tells you what segment number it is. It doesn't tell you what type of file it is or what kind of data is stored in there.

 

I think something like that is going on here, and the example I just gave was meant to serve as an analogy. It's impossible to tell for sure, though.

Edited by Cornstalks

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It may not be a file type. Windows will say the type is whatever extension the file has (ie the last bit of text after the period/dot). Go into your folder options and uncheck "Hide known file extensions" and the other 3 file types will be shown (.1, .2, .3). Apparently your computer recognizes that those file types belong to some application.
 
Those also could just be the order the shots were taken.

Actually, when Windows doesn't recognize a file's extension, it uses the generic "[EXTENSION] file" naming scheme. So I'm guessing this is just a weird file concatenation method.

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Looks like to me an application split a file up in to small pieces - can you open with anything like some kind of photo viewer? how do you know they are images? a lot of file types have headers to help identify them maybe open in notepad and see if you see anything there

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Yes, I can open the file with Irfanview software. Actually those files are soma data used to reconstruct 3D model from a stack of images and saved ina folder and each image file got name 1 File (.1)  etc as shown in the attached picture, This one I got from some example used in VTK. I also posted question to them and waiting for reply. As I also have some raw image file and I wanted to use the example to reconstruct, but failed tounderstand the file type to work with.  that's why asking whether anyone familiar with these kind of images. if somebody know about conversion of these kind of file, please let me know.

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Do you have a hex editor handy? A spurious file extension isn't telling anyone anything, but a peek at the header info may shed some light. Alternatively, irfanview may tell you something about the format of an open document.

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