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kaktusas2598

Does game programmer need to be good artist?

5 posts in this topic

Hello everyone, my question is really simple. I am programmer, I had passion for it for long time now and my dream is to be game programmer. One thing, that is bugging me is game art. I dream to break into industry and I know, that I must create something really cool to achieve this goal. Also I'm terrible at arts and modeling. For example I create some 3D game, but it's models, graphics and so on is terrible, so can I come into game industry as game programmer without not being good artist? Really, my sprites, models, textures suck... And I don't personally know any man, who can help me and paint some graphics for my games. Thank you.

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1. my question is really simple. Does game programmer need to be good artist?
2. can I come into game industry as game programmer without not being good artist?
3.  I don't personally know any man, who can help me and paint some graphics for my games.

1. No.
2. Yes.
3. What's your point? If you work at a game company, other people will be doing all the art.

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The internet is full of free game art assets, in case you really want to fill your 'portfolio game' with beautiful graphics. 

If you are programmer, you don't need to be an artist at all. You do your job, artists do their.

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What's the problem. If I will create the game for my portfolio. Will people whom I apply to, look into my game art, or it is perfectly legit to use free assets from internet?

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Will people whom I apply to, look into my game art,

 

Hirers who are looking for programmers expect to see good code. They also want to see people who have worked collaboratively before. Why don't you check the Classifieds. There are surely a lot of people there looking for programmers to work on portfolio pieces.  But now the discussion is veering off topic for the Breaking In forum. 

 

or it is perfectly legit to use free assets from internet?

 

It depends on what the EULA says. If you have questions about the legality of using assets, please ask those questions in the Business forum, not this forum.

 

I gather that your question "does a programmer have to be an artist" is now answered satisfactorily, and now you have legal questions and questions about how to recruit people to help you build a portfolio.  Those questions are not related to your original question, so I'm closing this thread. 

Your legal questions belong in Business And Law.

Your questions about how to find people belong in Production And Management.

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What's the problem. If I will create the game for my portfolio. Will people whom I apply to, look into my game art, or it is perfectly legit to use free assets from internet?

Firstly, you should check job listings from actual companies to get an idea of what they want.  If they want only to see code samples, you already know you are in the clear.

 

If you need to send completed projects or demos, of course you will need some art, but if you are focusing this much on the quality of the art it means you are missing one of the most important points: Whistles, bells, and attention to detail that exist regardless of the quality of the art.

 

One of the samples I sent to get my first job was a Tetris clone.  The blocks were 16×16 16-bit style and certainly nothing special as far as art itself goes.

But I added a bunch of little things.  One of the blocks looked like a Thwomp from Super Mario World and had a different expression after he landed, and yet another expression when a bunch of blocks were piled on top of him.

Likewise I had explosions for when blocks were destroyed.  They were ripped from Final Fantasy VII but scaled down so much no one could tell that.

They also all exploded at slightly different scales and periods of time, adding a lot to the visual appeal.

Other blocks had an occasional sparkle.

Those added nothing to the gameplay and weren’t good art, but they were little touches that told the company, “This person pays attention to the little details.”

 

 

So even if you end up having to make your own art, it doesn’t have to be good art to convey a sense of attention to detail, and that is far more important.

 

But for what it is worth, almost all of the art I use for my test shots in my engine can be found here: Animium

Basically everything there can be used for your own portfolio works if you are showing off your programming (not claiming to have made the models), but do use common sense.  Some of the 3D characters are ripped from games and are the actual in-game assets.  It would not be wise for example to apply at Square Enix with a demo that shows one of their characters ripped from Final Fantasy XIII.

I would stick with just the vehicles since they are probably actually made by the people at the site.

 

 

L. Spiro

Edited by L. Spiro
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