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GeniusPooh

What is mostly use multi flatform GUI library WXW? or something else

7 posts in this topic

I try to all my engine and my 3D photoshop program and all my future development to multiflatform 

 

Thanks GOD.. MS getting vague and and everybody OpenGL's come back!! Thanks Gates Thanks for retirement 

 

What is so popular GUI library? or SDK?

 

I saw WXW and I using that in my company( not my own  I work this company for two days a week ) 

 

I think It's not bad. very similar to MFC and easy to porting

 

but before going I ask you about what is your favorite or prefer or famous ..

 

Thanks for reading

Edited by GeniusPooh
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It may depend on your needs in terms of performance and ease of integration into an existing framework.

 

If this is for your engine’s tool chain, performance isn’t as important and integration will be based around the GUI library itself, not the other way around.

In that case I would recommend Qt (they want you to pronounce it as “cute”, but I don’t think that is very cute so I pronounce it “Kyu Tee”).

 

It has OpenGL controls each with their own contexts that should work fairly easily with your engine, although you may have to work around the fact that your resources will not be shared between contexts.  You will have this problem anyway though depending on how you initially structured your engine, but it can generally be managed.

 

 

If you are looking for a GUI that would actually go inside your engine and shipp with a game, I would suggest to make your own custom one.

None of the existing ones are really made for that nor are they likely to play nicely with your engine.

 

For example, Crazy Eddies GUI System was designed for use in games, and is cross-platform with OpenGL support, but if your engine is high-performance then you are doing render-state redundancy checks etc. inside your own wrappers to OpenGL functions.  If this library is calling OpenGL functions directly it is going to cause problems with your redundant state tracking.

They do offer a NULL renderer but I have no idea how hard it is to hook it up into your own custom renderer.  It may be easier again to write your own GUI, which really doesn’t take a lot of work and can be quite fun.  You also have the advantage of being in full control.

 

 

L. Spiro

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What GUI toolkit you should chose does sometimes depend on what kind of result you want. The two big cross-platform ones are wxWidgets and Qt.

wxWidgets is just a thin wrapper around the platforms native controls, so it will always use the native GUI widgets of the platform, while Qt simluates them instead. This can cause subtle differences between your program and other programs on the platform. If that is a big deal to you, wxWidgets might be better. If it's not, you could use Qt.
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What GUI toolkit you should chose does sometimes depend on what kind of result you want. The two big cross-platform ones are wxWidgets and Qt.

wxWidgets is just a thin wrapper around the platforms native controls, so it will always use the native GUI widgets of the platform, while Qt simluates them instead. This can cause subtle differences between your program and other programs on the platform. If that is a big deal to you, wxWidgets might be better. If it's not, you could use Qt.

Quiet brilliant message

 

thanks.. Wxw is very similiar with MFC all my current works with MFC so It's easiest thing..

 

I never heard about QT thanks yeah , Wxw may start with MFC to global. I can see at a glance as you.

 

Hmm I hope people like WXW.. I try to use that for my main flatform

 

but I must take a look at about QT.

 

A little difference about appearance not that much bad point I assume. and It's open source I can add features thanks GOD!

 

thanks wack

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I use Qt for all my window needs, even if my app is not going to be cross platform. I highly recommend it. (note: if you use Qt, I suggest you go to qt-project.org (not qt.digia.com), because that's where the open source Qt community lives (qt.digia.com focuses on commercial services)).

 

However, I've never used it for a game. I've used it for tools and other programs. But when it comes to an actual game, I typically code a custom OpenGL GUI system.

 

In short, if I want a "native look and feel" to a window, I use Qt. If I want a GUI for a game, I write it myself, so I don't have experience with other OpenGL/D3D GUI systems to recommend.

Edited by Cornstalks
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I use Qt for all my window needs, even if my app is not going to be cross platform. I highly recommend it. (note: if you use Qt, I suggest you go to qt-project.org (not qt.digia.com), because that's where the open source Qt community lives (qt.digia.com focuses on commercial services)).

 

However, I've never used it for a game. I've used it for tools and other programs. But when it comes to an actual game, I typically code a custom OpenGL GUI system.

 

In short, if I want a "native look and feel" to a window, I use Qt. If I want a GUI for a game, I write it myself, so I don't have experience with other OpenGL/D3D GUI systems to recommend.

 

 

Thank you kind words..

 

I saw many QT support on many free sources.. Hmm

 

I must check QT.. :)

 

Did you use WXW? or MFC before?

 

IF you can plz tell me diffrerence

 

Thanks 

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