• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Karnot

Artificially limiting player's choice

6 posts in this topic

Suppose you talk to your girl one day, and you decided to have a date two days from now. Later that day, you browse the net, and order a book, and it will be delivered 3 days from now. Then you go to a tailor, and order a new suit, and that will be done a week from now.

 

Now, let's say all this happens in a game.

Assuming the player and/or character is willing to do all three of those things, is not in any particular hurry, and has enough money, what sort of in-game reason would you give for forcing player to choose only one of those three. The sort of realistic reason that would actually make common sense, not just "picked 0 out of 1". And more, even though the player/character is not really in any particular hurry, what sort of reason would you create to make player care about how much in-game time will each choice take to complete ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The very essence of a game is the concept of artificially restricted choices, so don't overthink it too much. You can literally just present it as a 3-way choice if you like. Servant of the Lord gave some great suggestions for how you can cover it up with narrative, but you may not need to.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to what's been said above, present to the player the potential benefits of choosing one path or another.  It is a fine line, to be sure, but presenting choices to the player is often the key to making a game experience feel like one's own.  That sort of thing is the key to people talking to one another about the game, where player A says "oh well I made a date with my g/f so I was at this restaurant when some dude tried to hold up the place...!"  and player B goes:  "Awesome!  Well I got this book that had this creepy paper tucked in it that told me to meet some lady at midnight, I'm gonna play it out tonight and see what happens!".

 

Though, to echo what Kylotan said, you may not need to do much besides present the choice.  Take a game like the newer Persona games... Aside from the dungeon crawling aspect, you would go through each day in terms of day part and you would make one choice for each.  Like, after school, you could choose one person to hang out and spend time with.  The game was built around cultivating relationships with different people but you could only choose one person each day.  In the gameworld, that's just the way it works, there's never an explanation given as to why you can't spend time with groups of people at once, you just can't, and it works fine.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any reason such a problem must be presented to the player?

Well, naturally. Let's say that you have an option presented to the player before the "level", that will somewhat help to cope with the regular gameplay. And you have some other options present in a list as well. Well, why shouldnt the player just pick every one of them ? And if there is an option that the player will pick every single time - why is it in the list in the first place ? It makes sense to just automate it. But i dont want to. I have just such an option, that a player pretty much should always pick before playing a "level", except what i want, is to make it a conscious choice on their part. It is desirable, yet it must be considered if some other options are vying to be attended to, and it has to make sense as the game itself is relying rather heavily on common sense.

 

You could put them all at the same point in time, so choosing one is forced by only being in one place at one time.

Well, except, as in my example, all options are rather prolonged in time, and there is actually no apparent reason (if it were in fact happening in real world) why you cant do them simultaneously. Same with the other solutions you provided. Since all  the choices take place over several days, nothing really stops one from charging the phone/refueling the car.

 

Or, you could limit his money.

It would work, of course, but the problem is that one of the end-game goals is to amass as much money as possible. So if the player decides to go for that ending - the solution stops working entirely.

 

the choices all take place in Town X, but Town X is going to get attacked soon, only you don't know exactly when, so staying in Town X longer increases your perceived risk of being attacked.

This one would solve the limited time part rather nicely.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote

Or, you could limit his money.

It would work, of course, but the problem is that one of the end-game goals is to amass as much money as possible. So if the player decides to go for that ending - the solution stops working entirely.

 

Could, then, this not be a valid point still? Such as, you are limited in what you can do at one time unless you decide to amass a fortune. In that case, like in real life you can go out more, buy stuff, etc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what sort of in-game reason would you give for forcing player to choose only one of those three.

 

none. this is usually indicative of an attempt to add dunsel features. 

 

more specifics about the game type etc are required for a more considered response as opposed to hit or miss suggestions fired blind (which sometimes work quite well).

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0