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Dynamo_Maestro

Scroogled

15 posts in this topic

http://www.scroogled.com/

 

Came across that site today, while the links and stuff work, did MS really do it? Not bothered if they did I still like them / google, it just seems poorly designed (well on the main page it did), MS aren't really ones for bad quality but that website looks kindda shit (on the first page) haha

 

Did MS really do it? Seems kindda bold

 

As for privacy, honestly I started using the internet since I was a kid with a "what you post gets seen by all" rule, so privacy drama generally doesn't bother me but I can understand why it would annoy everyone else. I say this as someone who doesn't have a facebook / twitter

Edited by Dynamo_Maestro
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So many people think they have privacy when they use technology.

 

Let's make it clear:

 

 

YOU HAVE NO PRIVACY ONLINE.

 

 

Clear enough?

 

In many countries, including the United States, when something is online and stored on a server the end user has no "reasonable expectation of privacy".  Even if the company has a privacy policy, even if the company says they don't share their data with anyone, YOU HAVE NO REASONABLE EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY.

 

This applies to all areas of technology.

 

In recent and related news, courts have found that you have no reasonable expectation of privacy even on data stored on your own devices simply because it goes through the electronic tubes.

 

The fact that Google and other companies are sharing the information is not really news.  That is SOP for all companies and governments.

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Just checked MSDN seems like this is legit, funny results tbh, I expected hate a rage for google seeing how facebook piracy results in floods of angry comments but most people actually supported their information and e-mails being read.

 

Double standards :(

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So Google collects personal info and shares it with other parties. Big news, that's been Googles business model ever since.

 

You can't trust Google. Again, big news. You can't trust Microsoft or Apple either. But the real question is: "What makes you think you could possibly trust any such company? Or why would you want to, anyway?".

 

Companies want to make money, them gaining money means you losing money. Their interest is therefore inherently antipodal to yours. There are two ways of making money, directly (you buy something from them) or indirectly (by advertising, selling personal info, etc). If there can be anything like "trust", it can only ever occur in the first case.

 

You can trust that if you pay for a product, you will get it delivered, too (wait, did someone say "Kindle"?). If you think you can trust them in any other way, you're just being naive.

Edited by samoth
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I think the ad campaign feels very amatuerish. I did laugh at 'scroogled' as a word, but the ads came off either amatuerish or alarmist rather than a more moderate, "hey we invade your privacy slightly less" vibe.

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I will admit to being a google fanboy to some extent (so far as I'd rather buy a google backed product than an apple or microsoft one in general), so take my comments as you will.  But the whole scroogled campaign really does seem kinda amateurish I think is a good word as mentioned further up.  It kinda strikes me as a politician getting up there and saying what a liar the other guy is... Well yeah, we all know he is, but you are too, so what's your point?

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I will admit to being a google fanboy to some extent (so far as I'd rather buy a google backed product than an apple or microsoft one in general), so take my comments as you will.  But the whole scroogled campaign really does seem kinda amateurish I think is a good word as mentioned further up.  It kinda strikes me as a politician getting up there and saying what a liar the other guy is... Well yeah, we all know he is, but you are too, so what's your point?

 

I got the political feel too, but as someone who likes and understands politics this could work to MS advantage. In one sense I think "that is a pretty bold move" but then on the other I think "that is a nice original / political hit".

 

The media has a massive influence on people, and something like this would likely have a big effect.

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Scroogled has been around for years - it used to be an ugly little front-end to google, that would route your search terms are results though a bunch of its own servers so that google couldn't build up a profile on you, but you could still use their great service.

It seems someone in MS advertising decided to buy them out and turn it into an ad for Bing...

I believe the name was made up by Cory Doctorow:
http://craphound.com/scroogled.html
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Whoa whoa whoa whoa.. 

 

whoa..

 

Wait a minute here.   If I become a customer of an app developer they get to know who I am?   What the hell is this world coming to when the company who made the product gets to have personal information about me?  

 

Next thing you know companies are going to start wanting shipping information when they need to send me a package.. my god.

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YOU HAVE NO PRIVACY ONLINE

Besides the corporate snooping of your data, there's also state snooping.
One of the criticisms against CISPA and it's friends, was that it wouldn't be feasible to collect the amount of data that was required by the law... however, the CIA and friends are already collecting all of this data themselves, and storing it in case they ever need it.
There's occasionally some legal challenges to the extent that the state can spy on it's own citizens, but there's a huge loophole for many of us. The USA, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand maintain a shared intelligence network - shared data and shared infrastructure. If it's illegal for a US agency to use this infrastructure domestically, they can just allow an Australian to operate it, and then look at the resulting data. A friendly foreign 'spy' isn't ever going to be 'caught', let alone charged with espionage.
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No one has ever developed and app or piece of software for any of the MS operating systems with the intent to steal information.. right?

 

All joking aside, sharing is perfectly viable for online app stores (in my opinion). It promotes sturdy structure and is incredibly helpful, both as a developer and as a consumer. The problem is people not learning what is okay to share, and what they should simply keep private/offline. If you don't feel comfortable with it, maybe you shouldn't type your name/phone number/password/etc. into that little box.

 

Just my two cents.

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I guess Google doesn't like me.  I've had a few apps on their store and they've never sent me details of the people that downloaded them. :(

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I guess Google doesn't like me.  I've had a few apps on their store and they've never sent me details of the people that downloaded them. sad.png

You gatta be in the special club=-) (actually, i have no idea, as i've never made an app for their market place)

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I also dislike Google Play's recent policy on forcing Google+ for leaving a review, as a user and a developer (I wrote about it here).

Whilst MS are obviously making their own angle on this for Windows Phone, this information about Google Play has received attention in the press recently, e.g., http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20130213/09394921962/google-play-flaw-gives-app-developers-purchasers-information.shtml .

About the page looking amateurish - well, it does, because the coloured lettering looks like the sort of "each letter in a different colour" that you do when you're in primary school. But then hang on - that's taken from Google!

YOU HAVE NO PRIVACY ONLINE.

... 

In many countries, including the United States, when something is online and stored on a server the end user has no "reasonable expectation of privacy".  Even if the company has a privacy policy, even if the company says they don't share their data with anyone, YOU HAVE NO REASONABLE EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY.

I would have thought that passing on information without asking would be in breach of UK or European data protection laws?

But the whole scroogled campaign really does seem kinda amateurish I think is a good word as mentioned further up.  It kinda strikes me as a politician getting up there and saying what a liar the other guy is... Well yeah, we all know he is, but you are too, so what's your point?

But you've just argued away the need for all advertising. Of course as with any advert, people will take it with a pinch of salt, but it conveys information and makes an argument about one product versus the other, just like any other.

Does Windows Phone do this too? If not, your "but you are too" isn't true. If they do, it's false advertising. MS may not have a great history, but the point is that there are still some people who think that other companies like Google can do no wrong. If the conclusion such people reach is "They're as bad as each other", that's better for MS than "It's only MS who are evil".

Next thing you know companies are going to start wanting shipping information when they need to send me a package.. my god.

It's about needing to know - obviously they need to know the shipping address when they want to ship something, but the thing about a mobile application is, there isn't any shipping address. Also, it's not that Google are made aware of this information, but that they pass the information on, and apparently do so without telling.

No one has ever developed and app or piece of software for any of the MS operating systems with the intent to steal information.. right?

I'm not sure how that's relevant, the issue is the online application sites for Windows Phone and Android.
 

All joking aside, sharing is perfectly viable for online app stores (in my opinion). It promotes sturdy structure and is incredibly helpful, both as a developer and as a consumer. The problem is people not learning what is okay to share, and what they should simply keep private/offline. If you don't feel comfortable with it, maybe you shouldn't type your name/phone number/password/etc. into that little box.

Does anyone know where they source the information from?

I guess Google doesn't like me.  I've had a few apps on their store and they've never sent me details of the people that downloaded them. sad.png

Were they paid applications?
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