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dsm1891

where do you code when you're not at a computer?

22 posts in this topic

Hello,

I find myself travelling more and more, and imo nothing breaks up a 2 hour train ride up more thanddesigning code that needs to be implemented. That and it can often be more stretching than a crossword or sudoku.

Do you guys find yourself programming when not at a computer? If so where?
:)
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I just scrabble class names and method declarations in a piece of paper... "High level design" if you like. It doesn't helps a lot though, I rely (for better or worse) on what I remember/think than on my notes, often I write up notes just for the sake of writing up notes, not for reading them later.

 

Although its good in the sense that I think more about the problems I have to resolve by writing them down.

 

I do have a netbook with Eclipse around most of the time, but I prefer to code on my desktop (a single core Atom 1.6Ghz isn't quite on the same league as the i5 2500K I have on the desktop).

Edited by TheChubu
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I just scrabble class names and method declarations in a piece of paper... "High level design" if you like. It doesn't helps a lot though, I rely (for better or worse) on what I remember/think than on my notes, often I write up notes just for the sake of writing up notes, not for reading them later.

 

Although its good in the sense that I think more about the problems I have to resolve by writing them down.

 

I do have a netbook with Eclipse around most of the time, but I prefer to code on my desktop (a single core Atom 1.6Ghz isn't quite on the same league as the i5 2500K I have on the desktop).

haha, i never get into the nitty gritty of the math. but take it today (on the train) i had to re-write a function a few times after i completed it, because i kept thinking of different possiblities that 'could' happen. True, I could have thought up all the possiblites then wrote the code, but show me a game without 1 bug and ill show you a cat >(*.*)< (yeah thats my lame attempt at a cat)

 

besides, writing and re-writing code on a train only adds to the 'rollercoster' that is coding anyway (i.e. yay i finished, aww a bug, yay fixed bug, aww another bug....)

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The first thing i thought when i read this was "why would i not be at my computer in the first place?" lol :(

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The first thing i thought when i read this was "why would i not be at my computer in the first place?" lol sad.png

 

 

There is a place without computers? Did you found the door to the netherworld!?

 

I stumbled upon it one day when the power went out

Edited by dsm1891
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I code in my mind.

I hate when i do that, garentee no sleep until i solve the problem :/

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My head. Designed most of a system of a program that works out StarCraft II build orders when I woke up yesterday.

 

Apart from that I have my laptop that I specifically got with a smaller screen. It's only 14" so I can take it most places.

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On my phone. I wrote the framework of component based entity system for my current game using the memo app on my phone. It surprisingly worked without many bugs. I felt pretty good that day. I still often use my phone to code little things and to work out pseudo code.

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On my phone. I wrote the framework of component based entity system for my current game using the memo app on my phone. It surprisingly worked without many bugs. I felt pretty good that day. I still often use my phone to code little things and to work out pseudo code.

Ive tried that, but found the formatting being a bitch. I wish there was a app which allowed for programming formatting - idea...

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I code in my mind.

 

My whiteboard, for me.

I've always wanted one of those glassboards, you know, like on most crime shows (and they write on them with a white pen). lol

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Do you guys find yourself programming when not at a computer? If so where?

Mostly mentally. If it's something really interesting, I'll sketch something on paper. In general, when I'm away from my computer no real "programming" happens.
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On my phone. I wrote the framework of component based entity system for my current game using the memo app on my phone. It surprisingly worked without many bugs. I felt pretty good that day. I still often use my phone to code little things and to work out pseudo code.

Ive tried that, but found the formatting being a bitch. I wish there was a app which allowed for programming formatting - idea...

My phone has one of those mini keyboards so I don't have to push buttons on the screen. Typing is so much easier with a keyboard.
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I code in my mind.

 

I code in your mind too. ph34r.png

 

Ah, I was wondering why my programming problems solved themselves after a good night's sleep, now I know tongue.png

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I code in my mind.

I hate when i do that, garentee no sleep until i solve the problem :/

 

I would suggest fapping but mid way you will likely be visualising code, which makes you stop and think "am I really getting hard for code?"

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I code in my mind.

I hate when i do that, garentee no sleep until i solve the problem :/

 

I would suggest fapping but mid way you will likely be visualising code, which makes you stop and think "am I really getting hard for code?"

there is a joke in there somewhere

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I code in my mind.

I hate when i do that, garentee no sleep until i solve the problem :/

 

I would suggest fapping but mid way you will likely be visualising code, which makes you stop and think "am I really getting hard for code?"

there is a joke in there somewhere

 

If programming isn't hard then...

 

No, nevermind...

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I code on paper even when Im in a computer, its just way more freedom..

Some times I need to push a line from here to there, write a note, make links, give quick samples of classes and uses, push more lines linking than to the current code, and then after all the mess is laid out, I redo it, that time making everything organized. I cant do all of that just commenting on code.

 

Thats how my brain works, I need to organize information in a visual way. Even when Im building a game, its all mockups sketches and concepts for every possible moment, it helps see the game running even when theres no game yet, writing a design doc after that is way easier (not considering the really annoying market research part, of course)

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