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razorclaw

Reason for TPV + a gameplay mechanic

7 posts in this topic

FPV feels normal because you are looking through your character's eyes, right? But what about TPV? I know it doesn't have to make sense but why not give it a reason to exist. The reason would be that you can see from that view point because you deployed a Follow-cam Drone(or seer's eye if you prefer fantasy). This drone isn't some artificial construct either. It exists in the game. Other characters can see it or shoot it. If it takes damage the vision through the drone may be impaired but you can always return to FPV. With TPV you can see an enemy around the corner without them seeing you(however some do show the character barely sticking around the corner). But with this, you can both see each other but you aren't at risk of being hit. If the enemy were able to shoot down this small drone you would return back to FPV unless you deploy another.

 

Anyone know if a game that has done it this way? Did it work very well? Or would you like to see this exist in a FPS game?

 

Perceived

Pros: Optional TPV which is well suited for short range combat that needs more situational awareness. At the same time it could be a melee guy's vulnerability. Observe surroundings without being vulnerable. Good for sneaking, granted the "eye" isn't very noticeable unless close up.

Cons: Redeploying drones after being destroyed quickly could be aggravating. Drones colliding with surrounding objects. Difficult to make the drone look animated when in movement and not fixed in the air. Drones could be expensive to replace.

Edited by Happygamer
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first person view vs third person view ?

a lot of games already have TPV, they just don't try to find some kind of excuse(drones/seer-eye) for it.

a drone would have to be controlled, and since you want to keep it from getting destroyed at the same time it would mainly annoy players.

i can see it working in some kind special-agent-game with a lot of realism in it though, aka hitman, deus ex etc

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Yes, it would be for a more serious, maybe more immersive game. The drone would be controlled by your TPV camera or loosely follow it.
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It may be done well but there is no explanation as to why you can see from that view. Is nobody reading what I wrote?
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sorry, but in my opinion, (and i think that of most players,) looking through the eyes of a hero and controlling him/her is just as unrealistic as looking through the eyes of a drone and/or controlling it.
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I see what you mean. I guess it can be done, in mario cart the third person was some dude floating in a cloud. I see what your getting at I can think of lots of tp games but none that really give a good reason as to why, games that use a fixed camera position can claim they are all real cameras I think the one resident evil did that as well. I've noticed in some stealth games I've felt that the 3rd person to view your opponents was too much of an unrealistic advantage.
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I see what you mean. I guess it can be done, in mario cart the third person was some dude floating in a cloud.

Lakitu. His name was Lakitu, and he's the cameraman in most 3rd person Mario games.

I see what your getting at I can think of lots of tp games but none that really give a good reason as to why, games that use a fixed camera position can claim they are all real cameras I think the one resident evil did that as well. I've noticed in some stealth games I've felt that the 3rd person to view your opponents was too much of an unrealistic advantage.

You can always make it so when your character is in cover they are forced into the first person viewpoint. That way they can't use it to look behind themselves. How that would make sense with a drone I don't know, but it works from a gameplay perspective.

 

However, with a drone this could work as the player's "x factor" to help them through the game. It would even justify using a "vanity mode" to look at their character from all angles, and in so doing look behind themselves or to their sides. It all depends on how you want the game to play.

Edited by JLW
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