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levela13

Libgdx camera - pixel issues

4 posts in this topic

Hiho!
 

I am a game designer student who started working with box2d and Libgdx recently. My game idea relies on Box2D heavily, so I spent about a week learning Box2dWeb (which is the JavaScript port of Box2d), and learned hopefully most of the things that I am going to need

in the development process. You can see the end result here

 

When I got done with this, I took a dive into libgdx. Read a lot of tutorials and documentation, and managed to get most of the things already working, but I am stuck with the pixel to meter (and vica-versa) scaling system, therefore I can't get it working on my Android device.

 

Using Box2dWeb I could solve the scaling problem by setting up a scale variable, and dividing and multiplying with it. According to the web, 30pixel should be equivalent 1 meter, so I did the following:

SCALE = 30;

...

var bodyDef			= new box2d.b2BodyDef();
    bodyDef.type		= box2d.b2Body.b2_staticBody;	
    bodyDef.position.x	        = 400 / SCALE; 
    bodyDef.position.y	        = 600 / SCALE;
    bodyDef.userData            = 'Ground';
 
var fixDef  = new box2d.b2FixtureDef();

fixDef.shape  = new box2d.b2CircleShape(50 / SCALE);

And the ground was in pixel-perfect position, and when attached a bitmap to the ball, it matched as well! In Java, it is different..
 
I have followed a tutorial which made me set up an ortographic camera with a viewport of 48*32 meters, then positioned it in the center. I have tried the same method that I  used with Box2dWeb, but it didn't work.
 
I want my game to be playable on Android phones and PC as well, so I do not know how I should solve this problem (or how I should configure / resize the viewport) for different screen sizes, or just a simple screen size.
 
Ps.: Sorry for the half-finished post, clicked the wrong button as it seems.
Edited by levela
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Just plan everything in meters and use camera to scale box2d world to pixel units when rendering.
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I have thought about that, but won't that cause problems with the physics when resizing? 

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I haven't used Box2d enough to necessarily say a huge amount, but for part of my capstone essay I linked Ogre and Bullet together... basically created the physics world, and then had the graphical world be based of of that. Why would you scale the physics off of the graphics?

 

From my experience, the purpose of graphics is to provide interactivity with a user, and as such you would only want to tweak those.... 

 

However, as I have been using a lot of libgdx recently, I am guessing it is something simple that is happening.

 

For the screen sizes, just adjust the camera viewport, and if need be clip the background texture depending upon what you are trying to do.

 

http://blog.acamara.es/2012/02/05/keep-screen-aspect-ratio-with-different-resolutions-using-libgdx/

 

http://www.badlogicgames.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1940

 

Much of specific graphic work depends entirely upon what you want to do with your game...

 

 

With your post, all I can really say at the moment is somewhat generic advice and link you to some stuff that I found when looking for help getting my backgrounds resized a while back... without having them or the foregrounds distorted... (for a fairly simple game with downloadable backgrounds).

 

Anyway, a summary of steps I would take to do this problem are as follows.

 

1. Make my physics world.

2. Set up my graphics world to match the physics world.

3. If need be, adjust graphics scale, or the camera.

4. If things are not hitting properly, research each library to make sure that the [x, y, z] coordinates that I have in my head are correct. (In the case of 2d, just [x,y]).

 Example: Does Box2d start its physics body in the center for a ball, while my graphics are currently starting on the lower left [(x, y, width, height) vs (x - width / 2, y - height / 2, width, height)]. Without seeing the graphics code, which I would be reasonably familiar with, I am unable to give you a better idea for the research here...

5. If items appear squashed on screen, tweak the camera, maybe make extra graphics resources depending upon screen ratio, do more research into how my camera works, match up my demo application size with the camera size and see if everything looks good on the computer... if not, look into fixing distorted graphics.

 

Basically, if your window changes sizes, and you change the camera size to match that, and allow the view port to move, it will probably take care of all of your problems. As you are not basing the physics engine world off of the camera, it will mean that the physics all works right and you just have graphics to tweak.

 

Sorry if that was too rambling, I am somewhat tired right now and tend to ramble on at that point. I hope it makes sense....

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I have thought about that, but won't that cause problems with the physics when resizing?

Physics don't have to know anything about rendering or screen size. Physics use meters and when you need to render physics objects you just use that size as it. It's camera responsibility to know what size is the physic world and what size is the screen and then do the scaling.
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