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razorclaw

Who are your developer heros?

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Everyone that is in the know has someone they admire, right? Who is your game developer hero(s)?
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I don't have a game dev hero but I am practically in love with Microsoft, C#, SQL Server, Win Server, VS, Office, .NET, MS Maths, MS Visio, MS Project, IE10 (yeh that's right IE made the list), DirectX etc etc.

 

Im like a code junky and MS just keep giving me all these technologies to get high on.

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For game stuff, John Carmack, of course.

For video stuff, Michael Neidermayer.

For just being awesome (and compiler stuff), Matt Might.
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Carmack for open sourcing some of the games that used to rule my teenage world, Sakaguchi for the story behind why FF was created, also several people on GD for being awesome and helping people learn and grow.

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I suppose once upon a time it was John Carmack but, after working in the games industry I have come to admire anybody who makes games for a living.  Wheather it is a one man indie to a huge 200+ team.   There are coders out there who you have never heard of who can code circles around John Carmack and also people who suck at coding and math but still manage to dig deep and struggle through to make great games because they have a vision.

 

 

So if you code games give yourself a pat on the back.

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I'd say Michael Morhaime Blizzard's co-founder and Carmack ofc. But as Buster2000 said, not for their programming's skill, instead for what they created!.

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Kent Beck for Testing stuff: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kent_Beck

Jim Blinn for Graphics Stuff: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Blinn

John Carmack for Doom: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_D._Carmack

Jonathan Blow for proving an indie guy can make it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Blow

This talk was something else that made me interested: http://the-witness.net/news/2011/06/how-to-program-independent-games/

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Jonathan Blow for braid, and John Carmack for Doom, Quake engine, and of course without quake engine there would be no gold source engine, and no half-life and counter-strike as it is today, no source engine, no team fortress 2 and so on :)

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In one sense John Skeet. He has a depth of knowledge on C# and Java that is amazing. On the other end of the scale Bill Gates, because he successfully made it out of the programmer rat race with his skills and knowledge. 

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I don't really have any developer heroes, but there are people who inspire me to program indirectly:

 

1. Steve Jobs

2. Neil DeGrasse Tyson

3. Holly Griffith

4. Bill Gates

5. Hopsin

6. Hearts Grow (a band)

 

None of them are programmers, but their work inspires me, and they they remind that there's nothing better than waking up every day and expressing yourself as an artist through a medium you truly love. Sometimes when I go a while without writing code, I forget how beautiful programming really is. These guys remind me that as long as I stick with doing this thing that I love, I'll be able to find that beauty over and over.

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Gabe Newell, not for code, but because he understands the development process.

 

Every time I hear him talk, I am awe struck at how he thinks about how to get the most out of his talent pool.

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No one. Sooner or later I find out something I dislike a lot about every "developer hero" (Carmack wen't down once I read certain comments/tweets, Linus is about Open Source but not about "free as in freedom", Stallman its kinda nutty, and so on).

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After watching Indie the movie i found Tommy Refenes to be one of the persons i look up too, 

And Jonathan Blow for the awesome Braid.

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Gabe Newell, not for code, but because he understands the development process.
 
Every time I hear him talk, I am awe struck at how he thinks about how to get the most out of his talent pool.

Do you have any relevant interviews? I'm interested to hear some. I haven't heard him talk very much :/

I'd say John Carmack for 2 reasons, 1. he still writes code and inovates despite technically being able to just sit back and let someone else do it for him. 2. He has a significant impact outside his original domain with his work buildin dem rockets, which I think is just awesome.
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What? After all these reply no Andre LaMothe?

 

Other than the names already mentioned, my first hero was Andre LaMothe. My first game programming books is Secret of the Game Programming Guru (DOS). Or was it Tricks?

 

The fact that he is ex-NASA is a bonus point. And when I first know internet (when it was new) and managed to get in contact with him, it was awesome.

 

Too bad he wasn't as active in his forum as in those early days.

 

I don't know if it has something to do with how many people (fans?) give him promises as he fight Hasbro, but not much people follow suit, even in tiny contribution.

 

I wonder what will happen if there is kickstarter back then. Andre would have win.

 

Sony/Bleem/ and the other emulator tells that even if you are right, you can still lose. Sigh.

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Oh, and Ken Silverman.

 

I play his early demo game, and to realize his age, it was like, awesome!

 

Ken Labyrinth might look like 'programmers art' but that is the engine for future Duke Nukem 3D!

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All the old and new developers/entrepreneurs who did what people said they could not do back then and now. In other words all the developers/entrepreneurs who taught themselves, dropped out or had an "irrelevant" education and therefore did not hold a knightly title like software engineer or CS graduated and still managed to make great stuff that would make the people with fine titles look like amateurs...  

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Gabe Newell, not for code, but because he understands the development process.
 
Every time I hear him talk, I am awe struck at how he thinks about how to get the most out of his talent pool.

Do you have any relevant interviews? I'm interested to hear some. I haven't heard him talk very much :/

Sure. I think this one is probably my favourite.

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All the old and new developers/entrepreneurs who did what people said they could not do back then and now. In other words all the developers/entrepreneurs who taught themselves, dropped out or had an "irrelevant" education and therefore did not hold a knightly title like software engineer or CS graduated and still managed to make great stuff that would make the people with fine titles look like amateurs...  

 

Ditto

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I would have to say shigeru miyamoto the man and his characters were instrumental  to most of my childhood and early teenage years.  I have countless amazing memories with several of his titles and i am a massive mario fan to this day , to me Shigeru miyamoto is everything i aspire to be or produce as a game developer .   

 

I also have to say my appreciation for peter molyneux comes and goes i was heartbroken in my teens when " project ego" managed to only be fable 1 but as i've gotten older, learned more about game development and my perspective on the series changes I feel like everytime i go back to fable the game seems just a bit more complete than it was last time. while by no means perfect i think it includes enough subsystems that makes the world one interesting cohesive universe but isn't quite as deep in terms of lore or things as skyrim or the witcher . It's weird but i appreciate peter molyneux some days and i loathe him others haha but i think about him enough that i can definitely say the titles he has worked on and spearheaded have impacted me substantially .

 

lLastly I would have to say the team at " The Behemoth" their games are so raw and so founded on the basis of being fun and addictive first and then wrapped in their own unique style that i can't help but imagine it has to be incredible to work on that team. sometimes it just seems like the fun they had in development oozes out of the monitor / tv. screen and  i absorb it hungrily. 

Edited by JonathanJ1990
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For me, I'd say Jun'ya Ota, better known as ZUN from Team Shanghai Alice, most famous for his Touhou Project series.

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