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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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ISDCaptain01

I wish i could get credit for what i learn

8 posts in this topic

I mean I enjoy programming and all, but Ive learned so much it just makes me feel like I wish I could be awarded some college credit for it. I mean I just finished learning about data structures (equivalent to data structures 1 and 2)  all on my own but here I am with the knowledge but no credit. It just bugs the crap out of me. Sorry just felt like I had to rant

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I mean I enjoy programming and all, but Ive learned so much it just makes me feel like I wish I could be awarded some college credit for it. I mean I just finished learning about data structures (equivalent to data structures 1 and 2)  all on my own but here I am with the knowledge but no credit. It just bugs the crap out of me. Sorry just felt like I had to rant.

 

And you're not in community college because........?

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College credit is overrated. If you can write good code, and make things, and get them done, you can accomplish everything you need to earn real credit: credit for actually doing stuff.
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If you are in school you should ask about challenging or testing out of a class.

 

It is generally an easy thing.  Talk to your academic adviser and tell them you have experience outside of college.  If they won't let you challenge or test out of a class, ask the department head.  Explain what you have already done that shows you know the material.

 

Be prepared to take the exams from the course, and pay a small fee.

 

 

I managed to test out of several courses.  I just rechecked the costs at the school and they are unchanged; the cost was $100 to take such a test, and if you pass, another $10 to the school registrar's office to record the course grade and mark it on your transcript.

 

Many people will test out of general education requirements, and many smarter experienced individuals will test out of first-year and some second-year classes.

Edited by frob
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in life you will be doing a lot of things that you won't get credited for. get used to it :)

 

knowledge is only one requirement for formal education. time mangement, endurance and ability to learn really boring stuff really quick are some others...

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There are a lot of courses available that simply give you a certificate when you complete them.

Agile development has them, Oracle has them for Java, and so on.

 

If you believe you have what it takes, you can sign up for one of those courses, do the tests,

ace them, receive your certificate and put it on your resume. Also, experience in a certain

fied of work is extremely valuable - maybe even more so in the world of software development

and programming than in any other.

 

keep in mind: Everything costs money. Except for gaining experience. They should give you money

for that.

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College credit is overrated. If you can write good code, and make things, and get them done, you can accomplish everything you need to earn real credit: credit for actually doing stuff.

 

This is exactly what I was going to say.  You should attack an education with a desire for knowledge, not seeking a piece of paper that validates your intelligence.  I have met many a Ph.D that wasn't worth a damn, and many self-educated people that are absolutely brilliant. 

Edited by Glass_Knife
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I mean I enjoy programming and all, but Ive learned so much it just makes me feel like I wish I could be awarded some college credit for it. I mean I just finished learning about data structures (equivalent to data structures 1 and 2)  all on my own but here I am with the knowledge but no credit. It just bugs the crap out of me. Sorry just felt like I had to rant

 

If you are enrolled in a college and its not giving any credit or qualification - ditch it for one that does. Distance learning is a good alternative if travel and accomodation is an issue.

 

But if you are not in college, and feel you are teaching yourself without anything to show for your progress, then stop beating around the bush and enroll for a qualification in computing.  Even if its only a first year certificate, you should still do it.  It will be your first accomplishment in the field, and its something to put on your CV, which can only help. If you have no experience whatsoever, then qualifications are better than nothing.

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