• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
badsniper

Unity
Want to make third person shooter.

3 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm a decent programmer. Currently I'm working on a 2d title as an intern. I'm comfortable with programming and Unity environment. My long term goal is to make third person shooter which I think will help me to build math and physics skills rather than doing a traditional FPS. My problem is I don't know anything about modeling or animation or any artistic skills. So where do I start? Is there anysite that I can get assets or animation to make it possible? And trust me I don't want to dive into the project right away. Like I said it's a long term goal. Can someone point me in right direction? Which engine should I use Unity or Unreal? Unity because I'm comfortable with it and Unreal because I want to get extra skill set. Any ideas? Spare me if it's naive topic. Thanks in advance.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unity is itself a 3D engine and IDE system that is almost entirely based on 3D development.  In general Unity itself will handle the majority of the 3D mathematics that will be required to get a game started.  Beyond that you will want to have a good grasp on geometry, trigonometry and possibly some general physics (thus the reason so many people use Engines like Unity is that all of the important trig and physics is already done for you).  So in short, step one is to brush up on your late high school and early college level mathematics.

 

Next you would want to start working on some prototypes of your idea and a design document to start visualizing and defining the entire game, it's mechanics and specifics.  This is extremely important and will make years worth of difference to your development (Watch "Indie Game The Movie" for examples of the difference between designed and thrown together games.  Super Meat Boy went in with a complete thought out design and it's developers knowing exactly what they wanted to do.  Fez went in with a general concept idea with little to no direction and took over 6 years and at least 3 complete re-writes before it released).  So step two is to design and prototype your ideas to get a feel for where you want to go and what exactly you will be doing.

 

With those steps completed you should be about ready to start real production.  I would suggest starting again with simple primitives and working on your mechanics and game play first.  Basically you would be working towards a polished prototype, don't worry quite as much about what the 3D graphics actually are, just how to invoke the animations, translations, collision and such.  So your third step is to start actually developing the game using simple stick figure like primitives, focusing on the game play itself and getting your creation to start coming to life.

 

Once you are on this third step you will basically just continue working up this polished prototype, do tons of testing and slowly integrate more and more of the features.  At any point you can start replacing the graphics with final versions but I would recommend holding off until you are much closer to completion.  Many times models and graphics will change as time goes on and it can get very tedious and time consuming to continually be swapping out graphics and tweaking code to fit everything together properly.

 

All in all that's about it, brush up and make sure you have a firm grasp on 3D math such as Geometry, Trigonometry and some Physics particularly as they pertain to game development, design and prototype your concept extensively, elaborate and polish the prototypes into a completed product.  Should be pretty much the same process that you are currently following in 2D game development the only difference is that you add a third dimension and your primary calculation methods change from Algebra to Geometry and Trig.

 

Quick google search for some related reading...

http://www.essentialmath.com/tutorial.htm

http://www.amazon.com/Primer-Graphics-Development-Wordware-Library/dp/1556229119

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596000066.do

 

When you are ready you can acquire models from the Unity asset store, or through Daz3d market's (as well as many other such sites).

http://unity3d.com/asset-store/

http://www.daz3d.com/new-releases

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, Thanks for the input and resources Dan! Appreciate it. Should I do the development in Unity or Unreal? Which one would be better in terms of experience? Should I get more experience in Unity or should I add another skill set by learning Unreal?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest Unity myself.  Both are actually fairly comparable, however I feel that Unity is more Indie friendly.  It supports more scripting languages to create your logic in, the asset store has many inexpensive ready to use models (when the time comes) and the free license contains everything you will need to release a PC game for profit.  UDK is a bit more powerful and contains some features that you do not get with Unity.  Unity's Pro license is VERY close to the UDK system but much cheaper.  Although the numbers have changed and I hear UDK now offers a royalty based full license the following journal entry of mine explains in more detail why you may wish to avoid UDK.

 

http://www.gamedev.net/blog/1003/entry-2249527-udk-for-indies/

 

Daz3D models are also ready to go and fully supported in Unity which to me is a major benefit.  Daz3D is  different modelling program that allows you to focus more on assets, clothing and such instead of the actual modeling process, for those of us non artistic types it's a means of actually being able to create usable 3D models and characters with animations.

 

Do keep in mind that these are my opinions and suggestions but there are many other methods, engines and tools that you can use.  Many have their own benefits and draw backs, Unity is no exception, I'm sure there are down sides to using it although none that have ever effected me personally.  I would be interested in discussing all of this in a bit more detail if you would like.  You can find my contact details in my Game Dev profile and also on my Gravatar profile linked below.

 

http://en.gravatar.com/daniwan

 

Edit / PS

    Unreal and UDK are not used as much as many people may imagine an normally only by very large game studios that are not likely to hire or even talk to indie developers.  The companies that can afford and have the necessity for UDK / Unreal engines normally only entertain resume's and applications from veteran game designers that come from official studios with numerous released titles under their belts.  Unity is used by quite a few indie teams as well as many small and medium sized studios.  As with any field there's never a guarantee but Unity certainly opens more feasibly reachable doors.

Edited by Dan Mayor
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By Scouting Ninja
      So I am working on a mobile game.
      It uses slides for a story, the slides are very large. Each slide is almost 2048*2048; the max texture loading size I am using for the game.
       
      My problem is that Unity keeps each slide in the memory after it's loaded, even when it will show only once per game. This leads to the game crashing on older mobiles.
      My idea was to destroy each object after it was shown using a coroutine, so it deletes the past slide and loads the next slide. This worked because instead of crashing on 23 slides it crashed on 48 slides.
      After some profiling I realized that destroy() isn't clearing all the memory that a slide used.
       
      What I want to do now is assign a limited amount of memory as a slide slot. Then I need some way to unload the slide from the slot, freeing the slot for the next slide; without Unity storing the slides in the memory.
      Any ideas on how I would do this? 
    • By LoverSoul
      Hello everyone.
      I had a problem with transferring my character from the creation editor to the game engine. I created the character in Adobe Fuse, then imported it to Mixamo to put rig and animation.
      However, the appearance of my character has deteriorated significantly, and after importing into Unity, the character even began to look like a meme from the Assassin's Creed. Can you please tell me how I can fix all this so that my character's hair does not look like bits of bacon sticking to her head, and her eyes and mouth have taken their stable position in the skull?
      Thank you for attention.



    • By ilovegames
      Simulator driving with two modes of play - a race and free game in the open world!   Features: - 2 game modes - race and free game - 3 modes of transport - Buggy, ATV, Jeep - The open world - Realistic control - Modern graphics



      DesertTournamentSetup.exe
    • By NajeNDa
      Hi there,
      I am a game programmer (C#/C++) who is looking for a project to join. I am computer science engineer plus Master Degree in Game Development, currently working in one the most renown mobile games company (2 yeras academic experience, 1 year working experience).
      I have developed several prototypes or even games almost ready to release, but I always lack of artists, so I am looking for a project already set up or few artist to begin working in something.
      My preferences are:
      Unity or Unreal Engine 4 based project (UE4 prefered) PC/Console game prefered but mobile is accepted too Not interested in VR Serious team with almost all the roles filled or pretending to be filled 3D project prefered over 2D Guaranteed 7 work hours per week, Crunch 20 work hours per week  European team (if timezone is not a problem for you, so its not for me) I am not looking for any kind of money income from games neither the team, I want to do this as a hobby and a way to improve my skills.
      Cheers
    • By INTwindwolf
      COMPANY AND THE PROJECT

      We are an indie game studio consisted of professional and friendly people. Additionally, we are a team of skilled artists and dedicated indie enthusiasts. Our current project is INT, developed on Unity Engine 5 for platforms Windows, Linux, and Mac.

      INT is a 3D Sci-fi RPG with a strong emphasis on story, role playing, and innovative RPG features such as randomized companions. The focus is on the journey through a war-torn world with fast-paced combat against hordes of enemies. The player must accomplish quests like a traditional RPG, complete objectives, and meet lively crew members who will aid in the player's survival. Throughout the game you can side and complete missions through criminal cartels, and the two major combatants, the UCE and ACP, of the Interstellar Civil War.
      For more information about us, follow the links listed below.
      INT Official website
      Steam Greenlight
      IndieDB page
      Also follow social media platforms for the latest news regarding our projects.
      Facebook
      Twitter
       
      TALENTS NEEDED
      Website Administrator
      Unity Engine Programmer
      Please note all of above are remote positions. You will not be required to travel or relocate.
       
      REVENUE-SHARE
      We are unable to offer wages or per-item payments at this time. However revenue-sharing from crowd-funding is offered to team members who contribute 15-20 hours per week to company projects, as well as maintain constant communication and adhere to deadlines. Currently the crowd-funding campaign is scheduled for the first half of year 2018. Your understanding is dearly appreciated.
       
      CONTACT
      Please click each position to view the job in detail, as well as application instructions.
      Thank you for your time! We look forward to hearing from you!
      John Shen
      HR Lead
      Starboard Games LLC
  • Popular Now