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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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TheChubu

Installing Debian from USB disk

4 posts in this topic

Now this has me VERY confused.

 

See, there was once upon a time where I could fire up unetbootin or yumi, install a debian iso to an usb drive and be done with it. Now it fails installation on both of them (with yumi, installer doesn't recognizes the simulated cd-rom drive, with unetbootin it recognises it but fails to read some files after a while).

 

(Have In mind that I'm talking about a netbook here, so no real CD drive)

 

Now if you search for "debian usb install" I get some links that either assume a lot of things, or I'm too stupid to understand what is really going on, or were written by authors who where living in another universe that isn't mine. Something about just plain copying the debian iso to the usb drive and automagically works! (it doesn't actually) or some other needed file (boot.img) that also needs to be copied for it to automagically work! (it doesn't either).

 

So now I'm just out of ideas. I downloaded the xfce image from here: http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/weekly-builds/amd64/iso-cd/ Or that's what I think. There is a 10Mb difference between my iso and that iso, trying to download again, but that might be related with the fact that there is 800 branches in debian's directory tree so who knows if I ended up in the weekly builds or not...

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There is a 10Mb difference between my iso and that iso

 

Are you using the checksums provided to verify that the entire iso made it to your hard drive? Perhaps the images you downloaded simply got corrupted. Then I'd check if your USB drive is actually working, "fails to read some files" sounds worrying. Always diagnose hardware before software. unetbootin has always worked fine for me.

 

Is it just debian or do other distros fail as well?

Edited by Bacterius
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Im downloading a new image right now because power went off after I posted this (1-2 hs wait, 70-90Kb/s dl speed).

 

Checksums are different, but I think the images are different, though I haven't found a 637Mb xfce amd64 iso so it might be corrupted.

 

Anyway, tried to manually extract the iso and extracts fine. Checked the usb drive and passes fine.

 

EDIT: Ha! Got to see the syslog, md5 error :D Just finished downloading the new image. I'll try with that one.

Edited by TheChubu
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Good news. It worked! Seems like the .iso was damaged, the new one installed perfectly. But instead of using inetbootin and friends I did it the "debian way", which needs a working Linux install for doing some things (like 4 commands, nothing VMWare Player can't fix though).

 

Just download boot.img.gz from somewhere in debian's FTP directories (good luck finding the right one, there is testing, stable, daily, weekly, pink, green, chocolate flavored, etc) and the iso of your choice (in my case, debian testing amd64, for an Atom N450 which isn't supposed to support x86_64 but it does).

 

Plug the usb drive but don't mount it. Type zcat boot.img.gz > /dev/sdx (it will extract the .gz into your raw drive, note that you don't have to select the partition, ie sdc1, just the drive, sdb in my case).

 

Now you have the installer thingies copied to your drive. It will be useless for anything else right now and everything inside it has been be erased from existence. You should feel proud. Type sync so the changes are flushed to the drive.

 

Right after committing usb-drive murder, you just need to copy debian's iso into the drive. Again, without mounting it. Type cat yourdebian.iso > /dev/sdx. Once it finishes type sync again just in case.

 

Restart, boot from the usb drive and you should have a nice debian screen waiting for you to select the install options... Or a boot error message.

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Good to hear! And thanks for the step by step guide, hopefully some lost souls will find it useful (installing linux can be rather tedious when things don't go as planned)

 

Restart, boot from the usb drive and you should have a nice debian screen waiting for you to select the install options... Or a boot error message.

 

There is nothing more honest than a boot error message happy.png

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