• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mikenovemberoscar

Platform and IDE dilemma with C++11

8 posts in this topic

Hey all,

 

I'm a C++ coder, and I used to always code with Xcode on Mac. Recently I boot-camped my iMac to run Windows XP, and then acquired Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate and proceeded to use that for C++ projects.

 

I fell in love with VS2010, and it seems that VS is the industry standard IDE for the type of software development I am interested in, so it would be fantastic to continue using it.

 

My problem is that VS2010 does not support C++11 features, and I hate writing out a new loop counter variable which is used once to then create a 'currentItem' pointer, it would be fantastic to be able to take advantage of C++11's features. I also try and keep up with the latest technologies and update my coding style to suit, so templates  and the rest would be helpful.

 

If I could purchase Visual Studio 2012 Ultimate is there any way that could run on XP?

Could I configure VS2010 to run using GCC (or the MinGW equivalent), as GCC has C++11 features?

Is there any extensions/hacks/add-ins for VS2010 which can give me C++11 features?

Should I just switch to Xcode, or stay and labour with normal C++?


Thanks

 

mikenovemberoscar

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No clue about the rest but for can you install 2012 on XP the answer is a big no, not even on vista afaik, win7+ only.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a better question is why you're even running XP...

 

While it's possible to switch the back-end of Visual Studio, it's also a non-trivial process that may end up ruining your choice of developing in Visual Studio in the first place.

 

I would suggest you upgrade your OS. Failing that, I would suggest never using XP, which would mean you would just use Xcode on OS X. Failing that, I would suggest installing Code::Blocks or Qt Creator and using GCC with an IDE that was meant to use it.

 

Also note that if you want lots of new C++11 features, even VS2012 doesn't support a lot of the features. This little chart tells you what is and isn't missing in VS2012 and VS2010.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Visual Studio 2012 is very limited in C++11 support as well. The stable version of the compiler is lacking some major features like variadic templates, and the preview version is not production ready yet. I did use it for testing, but got several situations already where the compiler was simply to buggy to compile the code properly, and some features aren't implemented at all yet even in the preview version. Personally I managed to hit the limitations of Visual Studio pretty quickly when it comes to C++11 support, so I don't think it's worth the trouble getting VC2012 running on your macbook if your goal is to use C++11. And personally, I would go for C++11 as much as you can, I'm using it as much as I can right now since it really makes things easier. Right now I would go for GCC or Clang, which seem to have a lot better support for C++11 at the moment. I had some test code that to experiment with C++11 that didn't compile with the latest preview version of MSVC, but GCC and Clang both compiled it fine. But in either case, you should drop Windows XP as well.

Edited by MichaBen
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second QtCreator, and then install the latest MinGW release which supports almost every C++11 feature (though is missing a few of the new standard library classes, last version I checked - not sure if they were added yet).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies. Argh I would love Windows 7 but I just can't justify the money for what I'd use it for...

I'll look into Qt Creator for my Windows stuff (there was another IDE, a Linux one but I can't remember it's name).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there was another IDE, a Linux one but I can't remember it's name

 

Code::Blocks maybe? Or vim though it's not really an "IDE" in the strictest sense.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QtCreator is cross-platform for Windows, Mac, and Linux, so it might actually be the 'Linux one'.
Or maybe you mean KDevelop.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0