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How do you get a Deal with Sony!?!?

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Well, this developer who created "Thomas Was Alone" who is know making a game for PS4 said "If your an indie, get chatting with Sony now"
(http://www.vg247.com/2013/05/02/thomas-was-alone-developer-planning-on-a-ps4-release/)

I'm a indie currently developing a game. That got me wondering on how would I get "chatting" with Sony. I love PlayStation and would live to publish on PSN Store. How much are Dev Kits for a 1 man Dev team?
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There is no such thing as a Dev Kit for one user afaik.  The PS3 Kits I'm sure are getting much easier to get but I would bet that the brand new PS4 Dev kits will be harder to obtain than refined uranium.  Ok, maybe not that drastic but I'm sure they will be back to the strict requirements.  Simply put if they give you a dev kit they are giving you access to reverse engineer the entire system and exploit their networks (which Sony has had problems with in the past)  Being that their dev kit will contain source code and documentation on everything that makes the console what it is they are not willing to hand that over to just anyone.

 

More so your best bet is to build the game in it's entirety using technologies and engines that can support the main target console system.  Once your game is released and well protected legally you might be able to get somewhere contacting development studios that already have a dev kit and license.  Through an extremely hefty contract (meaning you won't see very much of the money earned) you can come to a deal where they will release your game and cut you back a small portion of the profits.  Beyond this as a first timer or someone with less than say 5 completed titles on the market I doubt you'll have a snowballs chance in hell (Sorry, but it's the truth).  I would recommend keeping an eye out for the new XBox and see if they continue to offer the Indie market place as the requirements are such that a basement indie can actually obtain a license and submit a game.  Also this counts for console game release experience that can later be used when trying to get arcade and full dev kit licenses for various consoles.  If this still isn't an option perhaps look into Ouya which from my understanding will have the lowest and most obtainable of the requirements as far as us indies are concerned.

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Sony were running a program a few months back to encourage experienced game developers (who wanted to go indie) to apply for funding for a title. I'm assuming the two are related. I got the impression that having worked on a number of released titles, and having a good concept, were still part of the requirements (although it seemed other restrictions had been dropped or simplified).

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There are two options, either you will need to be the primary developer or a contractor.


If you are the primary developer you will need to demonstrate that your company can bring a multi-million-dollar project to market.

Or option two, you need to demonstrate that your company will actually be working on those games as a contractor.


In both cases you need to demonstrate a healthy existing games business.
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"How do you get a deal with sony?"

You simply need to reduce the amount of !? in your headlines.

Sorry, i just had to :/ Seriously though, formality is a requiremet too, if you contant Sony with a title like "I can haz dev kit?!?!?!", chances are they won't even read what you wrote, even if you got ten well-established games on the market.
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Now, I have literally not the slightest idea about how these things work, so maybe I have no idea what I'm talking about but...  With their PS4 announcements and in various interviews about it, Sony has been paying a whole lot of lip service to allowing small indie teams to put out games on PSN once PS4 is out.  They seemed to want to make a point about making the PS4 an easier platform to get in on than the 360 has been.

 

Is it all just lip service and nothing more?  Or have they just not released any details about how it might work as yet?  

 

I'm just curious... lol.

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Sony is currently the odd-man-out, requiring a studio to have a track history of large titles before entering their console space.
This is what they hope to change. They want to re-enter the competition for the smaller studio.

 

Based on what they and some of their developers said at IndieCade 2012, they've already started reducing the experience requirement.  They welcome young upstarts who have a great concept and a great team who can prove that they have potential, and a business plan (a schedule and a budget and a monetization plan).  Experienced personnel are still a huge plus, and there are still plenty of hoops to jump through. 

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One of the things Sony has/is change(ing) is allowing what they call "self publishing".
Before, to publish a game on their platform, they would have to approve the concept of the game -- in much the same way that Apple can remove iPhone apps if they don't like the content. Sony is dialing back these content checks.
For this to matter to you, you still have to be a licenced Sony developer, own dev-kits, and pass all of the platform's *technical* compliance checks.

Buying dev-kits and paying for a technical review is still very expensive - I wouldn't consider it unless you have several tens of thousands spare in the budget. As frob mentions above, this is realistic for independent developers, but not for indie devs ;-)
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Sony just made it easier than ever for indy devs to flourish... check this out
http://blog.us.playstation.com/2013/05/08/become-a-playstation-mobile-publisher-for-free/

Playstation mobile is just Sonys appstore and SDK for a bunch of Sony and HTC Android smartphones + the PS Vita, its not like its expensive to publish on Google Play instead (which lets you target a far wider range of devices) (a proper PS Vita devkit is a far better option if you want to target the Vita, and they're not that expensive) Edited by SimonForsman
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