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TL2

Where do I go after 2D?

5 posts in this topic

(I realise it's a dumb title so get all of your "3D's" out of your system (if you're that kind of forum) tongue.png )

 

I'm making something in Love2D writing in Lua. I find it very fun and simple to use. Although I'm not at all familiar with much of the library (I tried the Physics one, it didn't work how I wanted it to, so I quit learning it...that's fine right? biggrin.png) I can still make some interesting things on my own. Like I've made a guy punch, made a helicopter fly (primitively but it feels decent) and some other things. It's early days but I'm making progress.

 

Just wondering what you think I should move onto when I've eventually learned most of the library? Because I probably will go back and learn it little by little, unless it's completely pants, which I'm told it's not.

 

I'm interested mostly in AI, but I know nothing about it atm and haven't even written any, I've just imagined a bit and that part of it excites me the most even though I'm not there yet.

Edited by TL2
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What do you want to do?  Did you have some idea for a game that you wanted to make in mind when you started learning all this?  Make your game!

 

If you're interested in AI then maybe that's an area for you to research -- create some simple computer players for basic games like Tic Tac Toe, or monster behaviours for a little platformer game, or anything that interests you.

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What do you want to do?  Did you have some idea for a game that you wanted to make in mind when you started learning all this?  Make your game!

 

If you're interested in AI then maybe that's an area for you to research -- create some simple computer players for basic games like Tic Tac Toe, or monster behaviours for a little platformer game, or anything that interests you.

I started off with an idea, then i burned it down and another idea grew...and that is probably going to cycle on forever as I've just realised I need to burn (well, not delete but just forget about the file except some key bits which are in my head) the newest one :D

 

AI is really fascinating to me. I think I will do something like you suggested. Perhaps creating different types of Pong players as I find them funny when they just follow the ball's y position. Would be interesting to see the "minimal energy expended" style of play as following it is definitely the most wasteful (but tactically sound) method.

 

My first AI is going to be the behaviour of some men I drop from a helicopter in this game I'm making. They don't do anything yet, but I want them to sense an enemy and maybe take cover and things :)

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For basics of AI, try doing a pac-man clone.  You get pathfinding basics and you can create however many ghosts with their own unique behavior.  And, if you get to that point and want to get fancy about it, you could start to have the ghosts think more as a group and less as individuals.

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I'm wondering just how low level that engine is.  You may actually be interested in changing that level, either something higher or something lower.

 

For example, if you want to code less game things and more AI things, you could use something like GameMaker instead, which has more code things done for you, but still allows you to script behavior for objects, which would of course include that AI research you want.

 

But, you may want to go lower level, and learn a language like C++, and you could then combine that with some 2d engine like haaf's game engine or similar, or even 3d if you feel you are ready for the added complexity.  It seems that this isn't what you want since you mention wanting to make some AI, but I thought I'd mention it here.

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Your a lot like me in that I also find thing amazing and wish to learn more about them until I am satasified with how much I understand. I am really into how to making a class that can handle 2d rendering without rerendering the pervious scene, and game logic based culling with indexed lists. I am completely for not using libaries once you understand their methods - and feel there are better solutions, and if there isn't -creating one. If you are into ai, look into pathfinding, and I feel a firm understanding of how you judge the "quality" of each move to determine path finding to be quiet a fun subject and the majority of how human it will feel. Also the cover checks may be something as simple as if enemyclosestdistant>defensivedistance and closestcoverdistance<enemyclosestdistance then run to the cover. A little more complex would work better but I think you follow. Maybe learning 3d by using 3d sprites for the men dropping from the heli would be a fun direction to head.
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