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Ralfomon

Would people play this?

10 posts in this topic

Hello GameDev.net,

 

I dont know if this is the right place to ask this, so correct me if this is wrong.

 

I want to make a game about a guy whose sister gets kidnapped. He wants to get her back.

The player can achieve rescuing her in various ways, but he can fail (like in Heavy Rain). 

 

The Focus would be on the family and how they deal with the kidnapping.

 

And, as special gameplay gimmick, I want to include something like an "Anger-Meter". The Player can choose between Calm, Tense and Angry answers on which each NPC reacts differnt.

 

The Artstyle would be something like "The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past".

 

My question is:
Are the general Ideas good? Would you be interested to play the game?

 

Regards,

Ralf

 

 

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With what you have written I have no idea what dangers you will have on your quest and if they are few and far between focusing the most on social and detective skills, I don't think it will be in people's best interests. But if there are some survival issues, it is a good idea.

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What exactly do you mean with survival issues? Something like: I have to eat; or: This guy is going to kill me if I do the wrong things?
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What exactly do you mean with survival issues? Something like: I have to eat; or: This guy is going to kill me if I do the wrong things?
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I want to make a game about a guy whose sister gets kidnapped. He wants to get her back.
The Focus would be on the family and how they deal with the kidnapping.
Would you be interested to play the game?

 

It depends. What's the universe?

What I mean is:

is she kidnapped to a different planet, and I have to travel via spaceship to get there?

Am I an octopus, and she is likely to wind up on the dinner table of a Chinese family on Earth in the year 1234?

Is this a Brothers Grimm fairytale setting, and she's kidnapped by a royal family?

Is this 1600s England, and she's been mistaken for a boy, and she's on a ship bound for Australia?

 

Since you're proposing a kidnapping story game, whether or not I would be interested depends on the universe.

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I want to use a realistic universo, so that the player can relate to the figure. It will play in the present time. The family is an average, totally normal family.
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With what you have written I have no idea what dangers you will have on your quest and if they are few and far between focusing the most on social and detective skills, I don't think it will be in people's best interests. But if there are some survival issues, it is a good idea.

 

Sorry accidentally downvoted.  I agree with what Mr. Slupinski and Mr. Sloper are saying.  A couple of ideas without any real context doesn't tell if people would like a game or not.  You're effectively showing us an empty cardboard box.

In order for us to get a feel of the game we need to know things like:

 

-what type of game it is (shooter, platformer, etc.)

-how you win (do you save your sister Black OPs style or guns blazing)

-what story elements are included (do you receive calls or items from the kidnappers just to remind you that they have your sister)

-Character personality (what is "normal", why should the player care that their sister was kidnapped, better yet how does the character interact with their sister)

-Gameplay (are you running around GTA style trying to find your sister or are you following a trail of breadcrumbs CSI style)

 

I think that an idea like that has a lot of potential, but without any concrete details I can't say whether I think people would play it.

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Am I an octopus, and she is likely to wind up on the dinner table of a Chinese family on Earth in the year 1234?

That saved my day happy.png

 


And, as special gameplay gimmick..

A common pitfall of game ideas is, that people tend to approach the game by a story, but instead a game needs some gameplay to be interesting. There are some games which are story driven more than others, but eventually these games still have some gameplay to offer.

 

To keep it easy, you should either come up with a kick-@ss story and use some existing game concept to tell your story or you should come up with some exciting game play ideas and build your story around this. E.g. heavy rain is a story driven game, whereas Portal is gameplay driven.

 

Regardless of which way you go, nobody can tell you if it is interesting or not. There will be always people liking your game/story and the other way around. Nobody can predict the general interest in your game (most secure way is to use an existing, popular brand).

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 Ashaman73,Dear Esther is completely story driven game. There is no gameplay AFAIK.It proved to be very interesting and successfull.  

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