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Breadth vs. Depth?

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So while I'm hashing out my game design, I decided to get experience by making the ten basic games shown here: http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

(Pong, Worm, Breakout, Missile Command, Space Invaders, Asteroids, Tetris, Pacman, Ikari Warriors, Super Mario Bros.)

 

Would it be better to do two in each language to get a feel for what's out there, or would it be better to just focus on one language and get really good at that? My background is Python.

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I'd say pick one and stick to it. Skills transfer, but there's no good in being mediocre in multiple languages. If after some time, you find the features of another language more alluring, or you feel that the other language is a better tool for the job, then by all means, make the switch. When getting early experience, try not to complicate it by also having to learn the nuances of multiple languages, and their standard libraries.

EDIT: I should probably clarify on "make the switch". Every programmer has a language they like more than the rest, but don't feel like you must use only one language ever, and that you must choose one to use forever. When I say "make the switch", I mean use the chosen language for the task at hand; another task might be better suited for a different language. Edited by Ectara

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Stick with Python until you have a solid reason not to.

 

This. One day you might want to switch to C++ or something similar, but Python has everything you need and is one of the least troublesome languages I know. Stick with it.

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Depth is better then breadth in this case as soon as you know how to program in one language to a intermediate depth picking up a new language isn't that hard it is mostly syntax you will have to learn.

 

Be careful with C++ though is it is not that easy to pick up coming from a managed language as you have to do everything yourself as where most managed languages come with a big Framework to help you do common tasks.

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But by learning more languages the depth of your knowledge will increase in Python too. You can't become an expert at Python without knowing other languages.

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